Rusty shutters #6.

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Holga 120N/S.

March, April 2006.

I have both the S and N models. The N is a Holgamods (Randy Smith) hack and the S was a gift from my wife.

I like this camera. Lots. The S has a roll of Ilford Pan F Plus in it right now.

The Holga is essentially a toy. It has 4 focus zones and two aperture sizes, but all of that is really a crap shoot! It’s plastic, including the lens, and light leaks are common.

There’s a hack for getting closer to your subject… focusing past the single person icon by loosening a well hidden screw on the shutter assembly. It’s located in a deep well, and once you spin the screw out you’l be able to focus a bit closer. Great for portraits.

I don’t use either mask. And I spray painted the inside of the film bay flat black to eliminate any reflective glare and I laid a couple of strips of gaffer on either side of the film bay to keep the film from getting scratched as it transports from one spool to the other.

To stop light leaks, I tape the whole thing closed with gaffer. Works fine.

Film type: 120
Masks: 12 or 16 exposures
Shutter Speeds: 1/100 sec – Bulb
Aperture: ƒ/11 – ƒ/8 (sunny/cloudy)
Focal Length: 60mm
Viewfinder: Optical
Focusing: Manual/zone
Dimensions: 5.3in x 3.7in x 6.8in

Pail.

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… by comparison.

I shot this photo with my Panny GX8 and a Pentax 25mm ƒ/1.4 (m43 50mm equivalent) c-mount CCTV lens, ISO 200, wide-open, using the Dynamic Black and White in-camera filter. A Manfrotto 785B Modo tripod and the camera’s timer set to 2 seconds helped keep things steady. I unscrewed the center bar from the pod to make the camera sit closer to the ground. The camera was just short of 5 feet from the subject.

The only post-processing is simple auto-levels in Photoshop.

I love the swirly bokeh this little lens produces.

The setting is the north side-yard of our home, sitting on a flagstone step, beneath the shade of our neighbor’s Live Oak and you’re looking east here.

A neighbor had set this pail out next to their garbage can for pick-up one Wednesday and I spotted it on my early-morning walk. I made a point of walking back past their house to snag it on the way home.

I store charcoal in it.

I love the swirly bokeh this little lens produces. It’s a great portrait lens, as well – you just have to get up in people’s faces with it!

Rusty shutters #5.

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Ricoh GR Digital II

July 2008.

Fun little camera.

Tiny. Killer. Awesome macro.

Love the 1:1 format, the GRD2 was my first digital with that option and boy did I abuse it. This is a couple of years before Instagram launched.

Love the B&W.

Love the 28mm.

Acquired new mid-2008, I’ve even got the little GV-2 add-on viewfinder, the wide-angle adapter and lens, the external cable/switch, and the AC adapter.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size – 3648 x 2736
Display: 2.7in LCD @ 230,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 180 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 28mm
Macro: .6in
Metering: Multi-segment, spot
Dimensions: 4.2in x 2.3in x 1.0in
Power: Li-Ion battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC

Goin’ large.

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But not quite 4 x 5. Yet.

I’m fiddlin’ ’round with large format photography again.

I broke out my Shen-Hao 4×5 field camera with the Rodenstock 150mm lens, the Polaroid 405 film back, and an expired pack of Fuji FP100c – 12/2011 vintage.

The Polaroid back comes with a mask, but it’s just a little bit off. I’m drawing one in Illustrator that’ll be more accurate for the Fuji 3.25 x 4.25 size.

The first shot was a success, a straight-on photo of the night stand in the war room, with the front standard tilted forward slightly. The point of focus is the lamp switch. It’s just a little fuzzy, I know. My choice of tripod is the cause.

I have an older Calumet tripod with a 3-way head that I should’ve used. I used a Giotto with a hefty ball head that’s hard to manage with the Shen-Hao sittin’ on top of it.

Not bad for the first shot and the film seems to be okay. I’m saving the negatives for reclaiming later on.

More to come.

Rusty shutters #4.

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Polaroid Spectra System AF.

I haven’t used this camera a whole lot. Finding useable film on eBay wasn’t an issue when I first got this camera back in 2006, and I only went through a few packs using this cool shooter.

I’d like to use it again, but the time just isn’t right. Polaroid Originals stopped producing film for this camera for a short while, apparently because of issues with the film jamming at ejection, so I’m reluctant to spend any money on what amounts to an experiment with their pricy film.

First released in 1986 and simple enough to use, a majority of the Spectra AF’s controls are located at the back of the camera. Among them, switches for autofocus off/on, flash off/on, and exposure compensation. The sonar auto focus could be tricky at times.

The viewfinder is positioned at the back of the camera on the left side and the shutter release is located top right, just above the picture counter.

The right side of the camera has an adjustable hand strap that makes it easy and secure to hold the camera and access the shutter release.

I like the images I made with this camera, and although I haven’t used it in quite a while, the Spectra AF is still in my collection.

Image size – 3.6in x 2.8in
Film size – 4in x 4.1in
ISO: 640
Shutter Speeds: 2.8 sec – 1/250 sec
Aperture: ƒ/10
Focal Length: 125mm
Dimensions: 5.3in x 3.7in x 6.8in

 

No nouns.

Whirlwind

Whirlwind.

I’ve been attending meetings for a different kind of photography club, the Round Rock Image Creators. It’s run by Gary Hook and Bill Ledbetter.

What’s unique about this club is the meeting centers around conversation and friendly critique (instead of a judged competition, like NAPƒS) so folks submit an image or two for the monthly meetings and 10 minutes are devoted to talking about each image chosen. Again, it’s friendly. Helpful suggestion is preferred.

The meetings are well organized and lively. Gary and Bill are really good at making people feel comfortable enough to share their opinions. I’ve learned quite a bit from the meetings I’ve attended thus far.

It’s a young club with a diverse age range and attendance has varied from 8-12 people.

An recent example of useful info learned…

At May’s Monday meeting after looking at about a half-dozen images, Gary brought up titles, or the art of giving photographs titles.

I thought I was pretty good at it, but when he and Bill started talking about how most folks use nouns for titles I found that I was guilty as charged.

It made me rethink at least one of the titles I’d given an image I made for Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day.

Originally titled “Kinetic Sculpture,” I changed the name of the above image to “Whirlwind,” creating a much better visual connection.

You can find the Round Rock Image Creators group on Facebook.

The meetings – FREE – are normally on 2nd Mondays, but for June it’ll be on the 3rd Monday – June 17.

I think it’s important to see things from a different perspective.

 

Rusty shutters #3.

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Canon Powershot S3IS.

The Canon Powershot S3IS is a smallish digital point and shoot camera that I added to my collection in late 2006, nearly 13 years ago.

The digital camera is equipped with a substantial, yet comfortable grip, a swing-out/swivel display, and awesome zoom capability. The S3IS has amazing macro, too.

I used the S3IS for a couple of years, in between a bunch of old film cameras that I’ll highlight in weeks to come.

My sister is using this camera now.

Resolution: 6 megapixels
Max image size – 2816 x 2112
Display: 2in LCD @ 115,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800
Shutter Speeds: 15 sec – 1/3200 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.7–3.5
Focal Length: 36–432mm
Macro: .39in
Metering: Evaluative, center-weighted average, spot
Dimensions: 4.45in x 3.07in x 2.99in
Weight: 14.5 oz
Power: 4 AA batteries
Memory card: SD/SDHC