Rusty shutters #15.

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Pentax K10D.

January 2008.

It was the next logical step, and my last Pentax DSLR before making the move to Micro Four Thirds.

With plenty of Pentax glass in my collection when the K10D was announced, I still had a lot of miles left in my *ist D and wasn’t in any hurry to make the upgrade.

So I waited nearly two years after its realease before adding the K10D to my kit.

It’s a bit bigger physically than the *ist D, but comfortable gripping with my right hand.

I added a couple of Sigma primes, the 30mm ƒ/1.4 and the 28mm ƒ/1.8 macro, and the Lensbaby Composer Pro Sweet 35 combo. I get a lot of use of these 3 lenses, plus a very big and heavy Sigma 27-70mm ƒ/2.8 macro. I also have the SMC Pentax-FA 50mm ƒ/1.4.

I still take this rig out. This and the *ist D both have a special place in my collection.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size – 3872 x 2592
Display: 2.5in LCD @ 210,000 pixels
ISO: 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 30 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Center-weighted, evaluative, spot
Dimensions: 5.6in x 4in x 2.8in
Weight: 1.57 lbs
Power: Pentax D-Li50 lithium ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/MMC/SDHC

BNW.

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Five of my favorite black and white film photographers on Instagram.

There is so much talent out there!

I’ll be using this platform for sharing some of the artists I come across on social media, people whose work I find compelling.

To kick it off, here are five photographers whose work I see regularly from my Dog Bone Soup IG account. Give them a visit, give them a follow.

> Roberto Gandolfi (@robganda)

> Dikal (@dikalphoto)

> David Johnston (@davidjohnston_diana)

> Liz Potter (@lizpotterphotography)

> Sophie Caretta (@sophiecaretta)

Rusty shutters #14.

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Olympus 35 RC.

March 2008.

To be honest, this camera was an impulse eBay buy. I’ve only run one roll of fill through it, a 24 exposure roll of Kodak 160T that I had cross processed.

One good thing about this project is that I’m digging out all these old cameras and playing with them. I recently ordered (and quickly received) a set of replacement light seals and plan to put this camera back in commission soon.

It’s small and light, uses 35mm film, and has a 40mm ƒ/2.8 lens. What’s not to like?

Film type: 35mm
Weight: 14.5 oz
Lens: E. Zuiko 40mm ƒ/2.8 – ƒ/22
Focus: 3′ to infinity
Filter size: 43.5
Shutter speeds: B, 1/15 – 1/500
Viewfinder: Rangefinder
ASA: 25 – 800

Four from the past.

Mystery #1 solved.

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diana

These are the only four out of 16 exposures that came out decent from that undeveloped roll of Fujifilm Neopan Acros 100 I posted about earlier.

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pattern

The others were either too blurry or the light leak from the fat roll made the shot unusable.

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embossed

Still pretty cool.

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go slow

Mystery roll #2.

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Not a clue.

I’m going to develop this and another roll today. I honestly can’t remember what this one’s all about.

I’ll know soon enough, though.

About 9 minutes in D76 1+1. I’ll have to presoak, then put this and the Holga roll of Pan F Plus in the same tank.

I botched the Hassy roll of Pan F Plus trying to get it on the reel. That happened yesterday. Failure happens, lessons learned.

Use what you have, revisited.

scan-comparison.jpgA little experiment.

An update on my adventures last Sunday morning with my Zero Image 6×9 pinhole camera.

I developed the Fujifilm Neopan Acros 100 that was in the camera back on Thursday, along with the *fat roll I posted about last Tuesday… more on the mystery roll soon.

Everything went smoothly with the developing. Stock D76 @ 68º for 7 minutes 15 seconds.

The negatives hung in the hall bathroom until the next day, and they were dry by the time I was ready to scan.

The Epson V500 I have has been a work horse over the years, handling everything I throw at it. But things went south from the beginning on this particular task.

Things went south from the beginning on this particular task…

There’s a white background that snaps in-and-out of the scanner lid, it’s not needed when scanning film. Took it out. Then I pulled out the 120 negative scan tray and loaded up a strip of three shots, set up the scan software per usual, and went through the process of creating a preview before actually scanning.

That’s when things started to go awry. The preview was splitting up the negatives in a way that was totally unusable.

I fiddled with every the setting I could, but the results did not change.

I remembered watching a You Tube video some time ago that showed how to scan a negative as if it were paper. I figured I’d play a bit and put the white background back in the bottom of the lid and removed the negative from the scan tray, placing it emulsion side down so the film curled away from the glass, then ran the software as normal for scanning documents.

Well, that worked. Kind of…

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Intrigued, but not totally satisfied that I couldn’t get the scanner to work properly, I set about fiddling some more. I noticed a button near the bottom of the interface that was labeled “reset” and thought, what the hell, then clicked it.

And this time the machine worked as designed. Happiness.

After a few dialog boxes, everything seemed like normal, so I set the scanner up again for negatives.

And this time the machine worked as designed. Happiness.

Here’s the result…

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I like them both. You can see more detail in the shadows of the first scan, and I like the somewhat distressed appearance. The second, proper scan is very clear (for a pinhole shot) and not as washed out.

It’s a 3 second exposure, taken at the La Frontera shopping mall, from a car wash located in the southeast corner of the property. I asked permission to park and played in an adjacent field, with my tripod and camera set-up in the shadows cast by the fly-over.

Love the lines, curves, and shadows. The sun was still pretty low in the sky and being blocked by the column on the left side of the image.

* a fat roll is when 120 film does not roll tightly around the take-up spool, usually resulting in light leaking to expose the edges of the last few coils at the end of the roll.

Rusty shutters #13.

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Fujifilm X100S.

July 2013.

As soon as it was released, I’d had my eye on the X100 but wasn’t ready to make the purchase.

And then when I was ready, Fukishima happened. So I waited some more, which turned out to be a good thing, because I was able to get my hands on the X100S, its successor.

The X100S is a classic camera in its look, it’s feel, and its operation. Everything you need to operate in full manual mode is available on the outside of the camera. I love that.

The Fujifilm menu system is one of my faves. It’s intuitive and just plain simple to use.

All the buttons and dials on the camera are easy to access and add greatly to the functionality of this camera. Smooth.

The only issue I had was holding the camera comfortably, but a silver LensMate thumb rest took care of that problem.

Plus I added a black Gariz half-case and the silver JJC lens shade.

Fun camera.

Resolution: 16 megapixels
Max image size: 4896 x 3264
Display: 2.8in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
Viewfinder: Electronic and optical, 2,350,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 00 sec – 1/4000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 35mm
Macro: 3.94in
Metering: Multi-segment, average, spot
Dimensions: 5in x 2.91in x 2.13in
Power: Lithium-Ion NP-95 rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC