Rusty shutters #23.

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Olympus Stylus XZ-2.

March 2019.

The XZ-2 was originally released in November 2012.

I got this little gem for travel. It’s a factory refurb I purchased off eBay for less than $300 and for an 8 year old camera, it’s actually a quite nice compact point-and-shoot.

The first thing I did was update the firmware. Then I added the VF-4 electronic viewfinder and the LC-63A lens cap.

Using this camera for the last 9 months has helped me come to terms with the Olympus user interface.

The articulating LCD is awesome. The controls on the back of the camera are well placed and intuitive, although I have accidentally hit the video button a few times.

The extremely versatile 28-112mm lens produces sharp images. The XZ-2 has great macro capability and the auto focus is super-quick.

It’s a cool little shooter.

Resolution: 12 megapixels
Max image size – 3968 x 2976
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 920,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/2000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.45in x 2.56in x 1.89in
Weight: 12.2 oz
Power: Lithium-ion Li-90B rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Could not resist.

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5 seconds.

I won this absolutely mint Minolta Spotmeter F in auction on eBay last week, it showed up in the mail yesterday.

Compared to what they go for if purchased from Japan, I got a really good deal.

Happy to report the meter is in fine working order.

I even managed to out-bid a few other folks and won it with only 5 seconds left. That can be tricky, as I’ve lost more than I’ve won using that particular strategy.

It came with a strap, a lens cap, and a case. All pristine. Happy to report the meter is in fine working order.

I was even able to download and print an English version of the manual from Michael Butkus’ Film Camera Manual Site.

Now I need to get Ansel Adams’ The Negative to complete my education on zone metering.

 

My latest film camera crush.

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PENTACON six TL.

The PENTACON six TL is my current film camera crush. 120. Love the square.

The 9 shots above are examples I snagged from Flickr. No attributions, sorry, but here’s the Flickr group photo pool >
https://www.flickr.com/groups/pentaconsix/pool/

Here’s the tag if you want to see more pictures on IG >
https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/pentaconsix/

… and here’s a fairly critical review >
https://www.thephoblographer.com/2017/07/25/vintage-film-camera-review-pentacon-six-tl-6×6-square-format/

And a good guide >
https://emulsive.org/reviews/camera-reviews/pentacon-cameras/camera-review-pentacon-six-tl-a-hopefully-comprehensive-guide-to-a-legend-by-ludwig-hagelstein

I definitely wouldn’t mind adding this medium format shooter to my collection…

Rusty shutters #22.

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Agfa Click-I.

May 2006.

Another fun film shooter from my collection. A very cool, very simple little camera made in Germany from 1958-1970.

It uses 120 film and has a switch on the lens barrel with three settings: two are aperture sizes, ƒ8.8 (cloudy icon) and ƒ11 (sunny icon), plus a yellow filter which is also ƒ8.8.

It uses a single fixed-focus convex-concave meniscus lens, a rotary shutter with a speed of 1/30th of a second, and the camera has a curved back cover that serves as a film pressure plate.

This little guy takes sharp pictures from about 5 ft. to infinity and I’ve even used hand-held close-up filters over the front of the lens for decent macro shots.

Film type: 120
Exposures: 12 @ 6×6
Shutter Speed: ~1/30 sec
Aperture: ƒ/8.8, ƒ/11
Focal Length: 72.5mm
Viewfinder: Optical
Focusing: Fixed, 5 feet – infinity
Dimensions WHD: 5.5in x 3.75in x 2.75in

Bom dia. Buenos días.

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Vámonos!

Torri n’me recently took a two-week tour of Portugal and Spain. We had great weather throughout the trip and everywhere we went the food was really good.

13 cities in 13 days. A whirlwind.

Lisbon. Sintra. Cascais. Evora. Merida. Seville. Jerez. Gibraltar. Marbella. Ronda. Granada. Toledo. Madrid.

13 cities in 13 days. A whirlwind.

It was jam-packed with all sorts of activities and city-by-city tours. We visited historic palaces, cathedrals, and synagogues. We saw Roman ruins, Muslim and Catholic architecture. Took a horse and carriage ride. We witnessed a Flamenco performance. We had a guided tour of an equestrian school. We even sampled Port and Sherry in two different cites.

My last-day favorite was a slow, lengthy stroll through the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, where art that I’d only seen in history books was right in front of me. Awesome.

I brought along three cameras – The Panny LX100, Olympus XZ-2, Sony RX100m3 – and my iPhone 8. Talk about an extended photo stroll!

We had a great time.

I put together an album on Flickr with all my fave shots. Take a peek…