Rusty shutters #5.

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Ricoh GR Digital II

Fun little camera.

Tiny. Killer. Awesome macro.

Love the 1:1 format, the GRD2 was my first digital with that option and boy did I abuse it. This is a couple of years before Instagram launched.

Love the B&W.

Love the 28mm.

Acquired new mid-2008, I’ve even got the little GV-2 add-on viewfinder, the wide-angle adapter and lens, the external cable/switch, and the AC adapter.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size – 3648 x 2736
Display: 2.7in LCD @ 230,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 180 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 28mm
Macro: .6in
Metering: Multi-segment, spot
Dimensions: 4.2in x 2.3in x 1.0in
Power: Li-Ion battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC

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Goin’ large.

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But not quite 4 x 5. Yet.

I’m fiddlin’ ’round with large format photography again.

I broke out my Shen-Hao 4×5 field camera with the Rodenstock 150mm lens, the Polaroid 405 film back, and an expired pack of Fuji FP100c – 12/2011 vintage.

The Polaroid back comes with a mask, but it’s just a little bit off. I’m drawing one in Illustrator that’ll be more accurate for the Fuji 3.25 x 4.25 size.

The first shot was a success, a straight-on photo of the night stand in the war room, with the front standard tilted forward slightly. The point of focus is the lamp switch. It’s just a little fuzzy, I know. My choice of tripod is the cause.

I have an older Calumet tripod with a 3-way head that I should’ve used. I used a Giotto with a hefty ball head that’s hard to manage with the Shen-Hao sittin’ on top of it.

Not bad for the first shot and the film seems to be okay. I’m saving the negatives for reclaiming later on.

More to come.

Rusty shutters #4.

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Polaroid Spectra System AF.

I haven’t used this camera a whole lot. Finding useable film on eBay wasn’t an issue when I first got this camera back in 2006, and I only went through a few packs using this cool shooter.

I’d like to use it again, but the time just isn’t right. Polaroid Originals stopped producing film for this camera for a short while, apparently because of issues with the film jamming at ejection, so I’m reluctant to spend any money on what amounts to an experiment with their pricy film.

First released in 1986 and simple enough to use, a majority of the Spectra AF’s controls are located at the back of the camera. Among them, switches for autofocus off/on, flash off/on, and exposure compensation. The sonar auto focus could be tricky at times.

The viewfinder is positioned at the back of the camera on the left side and the shutter release is located top right, just above the picture counter.

The right side of the camera has an adjustable hand strap that makes it easy and secure to hold the camera and access the shutter release.

I like the images I made with this camera, and although I haven’t used it in quite a while, the Spectra AF is still in my collection.

Image size – 3.6in x 2.8in
Film size – 4in x 4.1in
ISO: 640
Shutter Speeds: 2.8 sec – 1/250 sec
Aperture: ƒ/10
Focal Length: 125mm
Dimensions: 5.3in x 3.7in x 6.8in

 

Rusty shutters #3.

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Canon Powershot S3IS.

The Canon Powershot S3IS is a smallish digital point and shoot camera that I added to my collection in late 2006, nearly 13 years ago.

The digital camera is equipped with a substantial, yet comfortable grip, a swing-out/swivel display, and awesome zoom capability. The S3IS has amazing macro, too.

I used the S3IS for a couple of years, in between a bunch of old film cameras that I’ll highlight in weeks to come.

My sister is using this camera now.

Resolution: 6 megapixels
Max image size – 2816 x 2112
Display: 2in LCD @ 115,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800
Shutter Speeds: 15 sec – 1/3200 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.7–3.5
Focal Length: 36–432mm
Macro: .39in
Metering: Evaluative, center-weighted average, spot
Dimensions: 4.45in x 3.07in x 2.99in
Weight: 14.5 oz
Power: 4 AA batteries
Memory card: SD/SDHC

 

Rusty shutters #2.

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Pentax *ist D.

The Pentax *ist D was my first digital SLR. We’re talking 2006, some 13 years ago.

I’d looked at all available options at the time and concluded that the bodies of the Nikon and Canon offerings were just way too big.

The *ist D weighs less, is easier to hold, and compact in comparison. That was enough to sell me on going down the Pentax path.

I still use this camera today, mostly for TtV. It’s been well taken care of. Seriously. Except for the smallish rubber cover for the cable release socket falling off, this camera looks brand new.

The *ist D is powered by four rechargeable AA nickel metal hydride batteries, and I’m using an original speedy Lexar 80x 2GB Compact Flash card.

The menu system and camera controls are easy to use and the viewfinder works just fine. The small LCD display is only functional for the menu system and playback, not for framing up a shot. It was 2006, remember?

I have a decent collection of lenses for this camera, both Pentax and Sigma, but Sigma’s 28-135mm 3.5-5.6 macro gets the most use. The SMC Pentax FA 50mm f/1.4 is a close second.

I also have a few different K-mount Lensbaby lenses, the most recent being their Composer Pro with mainly the Sweet 35 optic.

Red earring, Princess Ally, Yellow, Pink tutus, Spring Clean.

Resolution: 6.1 megapixels
Max image size – 3008 x 12008
Display: 1.8in LCD @ 118,000 pixels
ISO: 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 30 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions: 5in x 3.7in x 2.3in
Weight: 18 oz
Power: 4 AA batteries
Memory card: CompactFlash

Rusty shutters #1.

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Pentax Optio 330GS.

15 years ago.

The 330GS was my second digital camera, a very compact 3.2 megapixel point and shoot with decent macro and an extremely easy-to-use menu system and simple camera interface.

It had a viewfinder and a smallish swing-out display with a tiny reverse button for selfies.

Powered by a pair of AA nickel metal hydride batteries, it got by with a Lexar 4x 128MB Compact Flash card.

It’s a great little shooter that I purchased new in March 2004 for around $300.

This little guy is still in my collection and it works perfectly!

Resolution: 3.2 megapixels
Max image size – 2048 x 1536
Display: 1.6in LCD @ 72,000 pixels
Zoom: 2.7x digital
ISO: 100, 200, 400
Shutter Speeds: 4 sec – 1/1500 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.6 – 5.0
Focal Length: 5.8mm – 17.4mm
Macro: 5.5in – 19.7in
Metering: Center-weighted, multi-segment, spot
Dimensions: 4in x 2.5in x 1.5in
Power: 2 AA batteries
Memory card: CompactFlash