I love a parade.

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Red poppies everywhere.

I joined in on a photo stroll with a new club I learned about a few months back.

The Round Rock Image Creators had their first walk yesterday in Georgetown. Yup. Right smack dab in the middle of the town’s annual Poppy Festival.

A short drive from our house, I got there about 8 a.m. to make sure I could park near Town Square. Good strategy.

I slowly made my way to the neighborhood just north of all the festival activities, shooting my Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1 with the Thingyfy Pinhole Pro S11 attached.

Today is Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day. I wanted to make sure I had a few shots in the can if I don’t get a chance to get out.

After about 45 minutes of walking around I headed back to the Escape to switch cameras for the stroll. I also brought the Panny GX8 with the ƒ2.8/12-40 Pro.

Anyway, a small group of folks from the club met at the north steps of the courthouse and proceeded to walk pretty much the same route I had earlier, but this time around the streets were abuzz with people and vehicles lined up for the Festival’s parade.

Naturally, I lost the RRIC group somewhere along the line.

That made for lots of good shooting. And, naturally, I lost the RRIC group somewhere along the line.

Perfect timing, just like when I organized a stroll around the Day of the Dead parade in Austin back in November of 2011. Shooting in the staging area makes for a lot of up-close and unscripted moments.

I got to meet Chet Garner of Daytripper fame – one of my fave PBS shows here in Central Texas.

I didn’t stay for much longer and was able to get out of Georgetown without any problems, traffic-wise.

 

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A perfect day.

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Sunny skies, awesome hot rods, and friendly people.

I made it to the 18th Annual Lonestar Round Up on Friday, April 12 down at the Travis County Expo Center in Austin.

It’s a two-day event. I make a point of only attending on Friday. There are fewer people millin’ ’round than there are on Saturday, which makes it much easier to get shots of the cars without folks standing around.

Friday’s weather was perfect.

Just by pure luck, Friday’s weather was perfect.

Saturday morning there were thunderstorms blowing through this part of the state – but it all cleared up by afternoon.

Hopefully that little bit of weather didn’t deter folks from showing up on day 2. It really is a great show.

There were lots of great cars and the people watching was unbelievable. I got plenty of shots of both, here are a few examples…

The real deal.

Pipe and glasses

A grey (and blue) morning @ ISO 400.

It’s been a while since I’ve shot film – I don’t mean Polaroid, Fuji peel-apart, or even Instax instant stuff. I’m talkin’ real-deal film. You know, 35mm or 120 – so it felt pretty good to get some shots earlier this month to post this week for the Shitty Camera Challenge.

As mentioned in a previous post, Battleground 1863 was a pretty nifty event and I had a great time wandering around the camp. The weather was semi-cooperative, with temps in the low 50s accompanied by a misty fog. Great for ISO 400 film.

That little Argus 520 did an admirable job, all things considered. Plus it was a great conversation starter with the guys dressed in uniform for the reenactment and many of them shared stories about old cameras and camera collections.

Here are nine shots from that 24 exposure roll of XP2 Super that I’m kinda’ partial to…

 

Up early, with a twist.

Greetings

GTX Photo Fest.

6 a.m. is when I usually get up, but my normal routine includes downing a travel mug of coffee and computer time until 8-ish.

Not so today. I had to be out the door by 7:30 a.m.

Today was the 1st (and hopefully annual) Georgetown Photo Festival.

But let me back up a minute.

I decided to take only my TtV rig with me today.

It’d been a while since I shot Through the Viewfinder and I thought this event would be a perfect fit. Last night I spent a good two hours getting my gear ready – charging batteries, checking camera settings, clearing and formatting the CF card in the ol’ Pentax *ist D – so it’d be a grab-and-go kind of thing after morning coffee and such.

I was ready. And everything worked out perfectly. Wake up. Coffee. Shower. Go.

Georgetown, TX is up the road about 17 minutes, if the traffic signal gods are on my side.

I got to the town square about 10 minutes early and could see folks gathering on the east side of the courthouse. A photostroll was planned for 8-10 a.m.

The morning air was around 46º with a slight breeze out of the north. Brrr. I wore a hoody sweatshirt. Seemed enough. Really wasn’t.

I mingled with people I know from PhotwalksATX, said hello to David Valdez (one of the event organizers), then joined in as everyone congregated on the courthouse steps for a group shot.

I started walking around, and promptly lost the folks partaking in the photostroll. I kept moving and in the span of an hour I’d made about 60 TtV shots. That’s when the 4 AA batteries in the *ist D decided to go dead. Bummer.

I went back to the Escape, looking for the other set of batteries I’d packed. Sadly, they weren’t in the bag. So, I put the TtV rig back in the camera bag and locked up the truck. Then I pulled out my iPhone and headed back into the fray using the Blackie app.

After another half-hour of walking around it was getting close to 10 a.m. and my toes were cold. So I headed back to the truck and drove home.

Yup. You know where this is going… maybe I *should’ve* brought another camera. Lesson learned. Next time bring a back-up camera. Maybe two.

I got around 2 dozen decent shots in all. Here are a few of my faves…

Boom.

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Battlefield 1863.

I had a great time yesterday at Camp Mabry for Battleground 1863. I arrived early enough to wander over to the ‘camp’ and mingle with the soldiers before their 1 p.m. performance.

A friendly bunch, not a one of these guys were camera shy.

I stayed until around 1:45 p.m. and got to see and hear most of the presentation. Lots of blank gun fire and smoke, but I left before they started firing off the cannons.

Along with shooting up that roll of black and white 35mm film in the Argus, I managed to make a few digital shots, here are nine faves…

Journey through the past.

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Drop it.

It must have bothered me. Not enough to act immediately, but I’ve felt compelled lately to right a wrong that occurred some 10 years ago.

I really liked it. Was getting a lot of use out of it, too. I even took it to Omaha, Nebraska. Walked all over town with it while attending a conference for the university. Got amazing results with it. I absolutely loved the user-interface and menu system. Check out the specs on DPReview…

And then one day after work I was getting out of the truck and I dropped it. It wasn’t the first time that had happened. It was the third. And final.

It came with one strap lug and a hand strap. Not my favorite set-up. I’ll never be a fan of that configuration.

I absolutely loved the user-interface and menu system.

Over the years, I’d occasionally scour eBay to see if anyone was selling theirs. In early November I finally found a used Samsung NV11 in near mint condition for an extremely reasonable price. $66, including shipping.

When it arrived, I spent a couple of days reacquainting myself. Played with all the settings and took a bunch of meaningless pictures that eventually got deleted.

It was one of three cameras I used yesterday while on a photo stroll near the Texas State Capitol in Austin. PhotowalksATX. Great gang of folk.

I purposely set it to black and white and ISO 1600, and off I went…

 

 

Polka. Polka. Polka.

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The Fifth First Annual Polkapocalypse.

I’ve long been a fan of the accordion, in spite of the fact that I was forced as a young child to take lessons, as was my sister! The squeezebox we used back then still exists and is in the hands of my good friend Marty K. It’s so tiny!

Playing the accordion is somewhat of a tradition in my mostly German family, so I got to hear a lot of polka songs growing up. Not a bad thing, really.

One of the first events I discovered after moving to Central Texas was the Polkapocalyspe at the Elisabet Ney Museum near East 45th and Avenue G in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Austin, Texas. The concert is co-sponsored by another Central Texas non-profit, Texas Folk Life.

I was first taken by the awesome graphic design used to promote the event – an illustration of a skeleton wearing a sombrero, playing an accordion – using typography entirely suitable for Halloween, or more likely, Dia de los Muertos.

The 2018 event fell on Sunday, October 28 which just happened to be one of the prettiest days we’ve had this Fall. With temperatures in the low-mid 80s, it was perfect weather for a free outdoor concert. The fest ran from noon to 5:30 p.m.

The drive down to Austin was painless and I got there early enough to easily find a parking spot just a few steps away from the corner lot where the concert was happening.

Specs | Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 + Olympus 12-40 ƒ2.8 PRO

I walked around the corner lot first, checking out the lay of the land and picking up a museum t-shirt while snapping a few pictures. I returned to the Escape to drop off the shirt, then walked over to the museum for a quick look-see.

After 20 minutes or so of wandering around inside and exploring both floors, I headed back to the concert, which was just starting.

There were a number of partnering vendors situated around the open field, but I spotted one vendor right in the middle of the action, in the shade, with a screen printing apparatus, printing t-shirts with the Polkapocalyspe branding. I stood in line for one of them. Well worth the wait. Pretty cool.

I got quite a few portraits, using the GX8 paired with the new-to-me 12-40mm ƒ2.8.

Even though I had some success, in retrospect I should have brought along my adjustable neutral density filter and a tripod. Next time…