Rusty shutters #20.

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Polaroid SX-70 Model 2.

November 2008.

I’d won an SX-70 SE Sonar OneStep (with a blue button) on eBay around a year earlier. It was working pretty well but after a good amount of use, 4-5 evenly spaced white spots started to show up in the pictures I was taking, lined up vertically and slightly left-of-center. A real bummer.

Looking for a replacement, I won this Model 2 on eBay.

It was in really good shape. The plastic was clean, and the porvair was spotless. And everything worked. I was using the Hanft-hack so I could use a few packs of my 600 stash.

I still have it. The porviar has degraded pretty badly over the years, but the camera still works.

When I went to fetch the camera for the product shot, I noticed there was an empty 600 pack in it. When I pressed the shutter – amazingly enough – the camera went through all the motions. Those batteries are incredible.

I have a few packs of 600 film left… I better get to taking pictures before my luck runs out!

Body: White plastic with brown vinyl porvair
Focusing: Split-image rangefinder
Lens: 4-element 116mm glass
Manual focus: 10.4 inches – infinity
Shutter: Electronic
Shutter speeds: 1/175th to 14 seconds
Aperture range: f/8 – f/22
Dimensions: DWH 6.89in x 3.93in x .98in

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Rusty shutters #19.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100

January 2015.

Hands down, my favorite camera. I pretty much exclusively used this little guy up until its demise – the dreaded dusty sensor problem – earlier this year, and then replaced it with the same model, a NOS box directly from Panasonic.

Other than that, this shooter is just amazing.

I have the LX5. Skipped the LX7. When the LX100 came out I was immediately impressed by the fact that it had controls for manual operation on the outside of the camera, an aperture ring on the lens plus aspect ratio, shutter speeds and exposure compensation with the shutter release nestled neatly between them on top of the camera. The back of the camera is just as tidy.

The Leica ƒ/1.7 glass was an added bonus. Sharp. Plus it uses a 4/3 sensor. Huge.

I made some of my favorite pictures with this camera. Love the in-camera effects. Toy Pop, Dynamic Monochrome, and Rough Monochrome are super cool.

The LX100 is just a pleasure to use.

Resolution: 12.7 megapixels
Max image size – 4112 x 3088
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25600
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.53in x 2.6in x 2.17in
Weight: 13.9 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Ex Libris.

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Learning is never ending.

A half-dozen photography related books I’ve added to my library over the past year.

Photographers on Photography: How the Masters See, Think & Shoot
Henry Carroll

Analog Photography: Reference Manual for Shooting Film
Andrew Bellamy

A Chronology of Photography: A Cultural Timeline From Camera Obscura to Instagram
Paul Lowe

Photography Changes Everything
Marvin Heiferman

Experimental Photography: A Handbook of Techniques
Marco Antonini, Sergio Minniti, Francisco Gómez, Gabriele Lungarella, Luca Bendandi

Zen Camera: Creative Awakening with a Daily Practice in Photography
David Ulrich

Rusty shutters #17.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1.

July 2013.

The only reason this camera is in my collection is because I spotted it on Amazon – body only – for $199, and even though it’d been released a year earlier, that price was just too good to pass up. I added the DMW-LVF2.

I mostly use the Panasonic Lumix G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH Lens on this camera, but also use the 20mm and the Thingyfy Pinhole Pro S11.

Great little camera.

Resolution: 16 megapixels
Max image size – 4592 x 3448
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.58in x 2.67in x 1.55in
Weight: 11.2 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Rusty shutters #16.

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Polaroid Colorpack II.

April 2008.

Funny story. I bought five of these cameras on eBay to cut up and make into pinhole (pinholaroid) cameras. Two pinholes got made. The other two Colorpacks were junk.

But one Colorpack II was in such good condition that I just couldn’t bring myself to altering it. So I kept it as is.

I still have it. Great little camera. I should use up some of the remaining Fuji peel-apart I have stashed. Maybe when the weather gets a little cooler, this Fall.

Film: Peel-apart 100-Series or Fujifilm FP-100C, FP100B, or FP3000B
Lens: 114mm, f/9.2
Shutter: Electronic, 10s-1/500s
ISO: 75 & 3000
Focus: 3 feet to infinity
Batteries: Two standard 1.5V AA batteries
Cold clip included

Messy.

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But essential.

I replaced the seals on the Olympus 35RC Saturday afternoon. It was another hot Texas day, but I had the fan blowing on me while I sat at my work table in the garage.

Removing the old seals was pretty easy, but messy as hell.

I used any and every tool I could find in the studio to scrape off the old seals and adhesive. Q-Tips, tooth picks, and mineral spirits were helpful in coaxing off all that ages old gunk. As was a couple of different X-Acto knives, skewers, and craft sticks.

Getting the new seals on was a bit tricky – fortunately the kit came with two sets of seals. Very helpful!

The trick is brushing on a little Purell hand sanitizer (the kind without moisturizer) to the sticky-back of the new seals, leaving a bit sticky where the seal is first applied.

You’re given a little bit of time to position the new seal, let the purell evaporate, then press the seal into place.

About an hour and a half total. Not bad.

I loaded it up with a 24 exposure roll of Fujifilm Superia X-TRA 400.

If all goes according to plan, I’ll be getting out next week with two local area film shooters. A short trip down to Austin is planned, with preliminary sights on walking the streets around the newish Austin Library. Maybe even go inside. We’ll see.

At ay rate, I have one of my Domke F6 bags filled with a handful of film shooters for the event. The 35RC, an Olympus Stylus Epic, Nikon One•Touch Zoom 90, Sprocket Rocket, the Fujifilm SQ6, and my Minolta XG-1 + 24mm ƒ/2.8.

Should be fun.

BNW.

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Five of my favorite black and white film photographers on Instagram.

There is so much talent out there!

I’ll be using this platform for sharing some of the artists I come across on social media, people whose work I find compelling.

To kick it off, here are five photographers whose work I see regularly from my Dog Bone Soup IG account. Give them a visit, give them a follow.

> Roberto Gandolfi (@robganda)

> Dikal (@dikalphoto)

> David Johnston (@davidjohnston_diana)

> Liz Potter (@lizpotterphotography)

> Sophie Caretta (@sophiecaretta)