Sunny *and* windy.

 

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8th Annual Georgetown Airport Car & Vintage Plane Show.

I had a ton of rusty fun at the Georgetown Airport Car Show yesterday, but I should’ve worn a hat. My face got a little too much sun. It was windy, but warm.

I walked around with Dennis Isenberg, ran into Miguel Ortiz and his brother Geraldo, and talked with David Valdez about the March 16 GTX Photo Fest.

I also met Matthew Magruder, who was shooting and developing tintypes on site. Pretty cool.

Great show.

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Cedar fever.

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Juniperus ashei.

The above tangle of trunks is what’s known in these parts as a Cedar tree. Texas Cedar, I’ve heard it called. Also known as Ashe Juniper, Mountain Cedar, Rock Cedar, Post Cedar, Mexican Juniper, and Break Cedar, to name a few.

This particular specimen is located on an empty lot in our neighborhood – a cave lot, as the developers are fond of saying – not more that 20 feet from the sidewalk Annie Bell and I make use of on our near-daily walks.

These trees are everywhere and they have a long Texas history. They’re drought tolerant, help with erosion, provide shelter for wildlife and livestock, and many a fence post has been made from their trunks.

There are portions of the nightly weather report dedicated to talking about this tree. And during the Winter there is much consternation over the amount of pollen these trees generate.

Cedar fever is a thing.

Now, me being relatively new to Central Texas, these trees being referred to as Cedar by everyone set me up for a certain amount of confusion.

Everyone I’ve met here seems to think these are actually Cedar trees.

Honestly. People have fallen for the ruse. Everyone I’ve met here seems to think these are actually Cedar trees. Even my doctor, who thinks my ages-old morning congestion is due in great part to the Texas Cedars to which I’ve only just recently become exposed.

Nah.

To me, these are Junipers. Or, at least, part of the same family as the Junipers I know from my life in California. Juniperus ashei, to be exact. So whenever I hear someone speak of these trees, I always conjure up the image of a real cedar tree in my mind, not this poor, scraggly excuse for a Juniper.

A couple days back I finally heard the weather person on our local TV station admit that they’re Junipers.

Whew! Finally. Now I can get on with the  rest of my life.

iPhone 8, Blackie app.

48 sunsets, 2018.

48 sunsets, 2018

Happy New Year!

I’ve had an annual project going since we relocated to Texas a few years ago, making photos of Texas sunsets.

The view from our back porch every day around sundown is spectacular, even more so when there are clouds in the sky. So much drama!

I’m not gonna give away all my secrets, but I use my Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100, set the aperture to ƒ5.6 or smaller, keep the ISO low, and use one of the built-in art filters to achieve the color-pop and vignetting.

Above are 48 sunsets, made 12 per quarter through 2018. Click the image to view large!

Another new gizmo.

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Platypod Ultra.

I think it was a post I read from Scott Kelby’s blog. Not a commercial, but a ringing endorsement for a small device to use in place of a tripod when traveling.

Intrigued, I watched a video about the little gizmo and was attracted to its small size and portability.

A few weeks later it arrived on my porch.

The Platypod Ultra, a cool little tri/mono-pod alternative that doesn’t take up a lot of room in my camera bag and can even fit in my pocket.

It came with a few useful accessories… 4 screw-in feet, each with a rubber covered end and a pointed end, plus a lock nut, making it easy to adjust height and level the device on pretty much any surface.

The Platypod Ultra also comes with a 20″ long hook-and-loop strap that makes it easy to secure the device to small objects like a pole or a fence post.

Also included is a carabiner clip that’ll attach to the Ultra in a few places, quite practical for hanging it from a camera bag.

I attached a Giottos MH-1304 Pro Series II Socket & Ball Head. Works perfectly.

There are a dozen or so small icons scattered around the top of the Platypod Ultra in locations that give clues as to which of these accessories can be strapped, screwed, or clipped.

Pretty cool. I dig innovation, and this little chunk of metal rings true as a useful photographic tool.

 

Rockpile.

One foggy morning.

We went for a short drive yesterday to check out a new connection that opened between our neighborhood and the hood just north of us.

Though not quite a straight shot through, eventually the new route will allow us to avoid I-35 if we need to drive to Georgetown.

Pretty cool.

On the way, I noticed a humungous pile of limestone rock situated on the corner of an empty lot. Empty block, actually. No homes yet, just a paved road with curbs.

Specs | Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 + Wanderflust Pinwide and Pinwide Slit. Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100

The pile is about 20-25 ft tall and about 50-60 feet across. Huge.

It was foggy as hell this morning. I thought that fogginess would make for great atmosphere, so I loaded up the GF1, the Pinwide and Pinwide Slit, the LX100, a light-weight Manfrotto tripod, and drove back up to the rockpile.

I fiddle and shot for about 20 minutes and came away with a few decent pictures.

The Slit shot is my fave.

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Rockpile. Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 + Wanderlust Pinwide.

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Rockpile. Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 + Wanderlust Pinwide Slit.

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Rockpile. Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100.

Loaded up.

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Ready to go.

I have three cameras loaded up with film, ready to get out and shoot.

My Olympus Stylus Epic is loaded with Kodak Ektar 100, 36 exposure, Color 35mm.

The Lomo Sprocket Rocket has a roll of Fujifilm Superia 800, 24 exposure, Color 35mm in it.

The Holga 120N is ready to go with Ilford PAN F Plus 50, Black and White, 12 exposure, 120mm.

Now all I need is for my Plantar Fasciitis to calm down for a day and hope that a little let-up in the rain that’s been falling in Central Texas happens simultaneously.

Maybe this Sunday…