Unequaled.

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Levitation

Visual splendor.

I received Keith Carter: Fifty Years today.

I’m slowly flipping the pages, soaking in the beauty of each photograph.

There are so few photographers whose work can put me in a trance. Carter is one of them.

Magic.

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48 sunsets, 2018.

48 sunsets, 2018

Happy New Year!

I’ve had an annual project going since we relocated to Texas a few years ago, making photos of Texas sunsets.

The view from our back porch every day around sundown is spectacular, even more so when there are clouds in the sky. So much drama!

I’m not gonna give away all my secrets, but I use my Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100, set the aperture to ƒ5.6 or smaller, keep the ISO low, and use one of the built-in art filters to achieve the color-pop and vignetting.

Above are 48 sunsets, made 12 per quarter through 2018. Click the image to view large!

Another new gizmo.

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Platypod Ultra.

I think it was a post I read from Scott Kelby’s blog. Not a commercial, but a ringing endorsement for a small device to use in place of a tripod when traveling.

Intrigued, I watched a video about the little gizmo and was attracted to its small size and portability.

A few weeks later it arrived on my porch.

The Platypod Ultra, a cool little tri/mono-pod alternative that doesn’t take up a lot of room in my camera bag and can even fit in my pocket.

It came with a few useful accessories… 4 screw-in feet, each with a rubber covered end and a pointed end, plus a lock nut, making it easy to adjust height and level the device on pretty much any surface.

The Platypod Ultra also comes with a 20″ long hook-and-loop strap that makes it easy to secure the device to small objects like a pole or a fence post.

Also included is a carabiner clip that’ll attach to the Ultra in a few places, quite practical for hanging it from a camera bag.

I attached a Giottos MH-1304 Pro Series II Socket & Ball Head. Works perfectly.

There are a dozen or so small icons scattered around the top of the Platypod Ultra in locations that give clues as to which of these accessories can be strapped, screwed, or clipped.

Pretty cool. I dig innovation, and this little chunk of metal rings true as a useful photographic tool.

 

Rockpile.

One foggy morning.

We went for a short drive yesterday to check out a new connection that opened between our neighborhood and the hood just north of us.

Though not quite a straight shot through, eventually the new route will allow us to avoid I-35 if we need to drive to Georgetown.

Pretty cool.

On the way, I noticed a humungous pile of limestone rock situated on the corner of an empty lot. Empty block, actually. No homes yet, just a paved road with curbs.

Specs | Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 + Wanderflust Pinwide and Pinwide Slit. Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100

The pile is about 20-25 ft tall and about 50-60 feet across. Huge.

It was foggy as hell this morning. I thought that fogginess would make for great atmosphere, so I loaded up the GF1, the Pinwide and Pinwide Slit, the LX100, a light-weight Manfrotto tripod, and drove back up to the rockpile.

I fiddle and shot for about 20 minutes and came away with a few decent pictures.

The Slit shot is my fave.

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Rockpile. Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 + Wanderlust Pinwide.

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Rockpile. Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1 + Wanderlust Pinwide Slit.

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Rockpile. Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100.

Loaded up.

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Ready to go.

I have three cameras loaded up with film, ready to get out and shoot.

My Olympus Stylus Epic is loaded with Kodak Ektar 100, 36 exposure, Color 35mm.

The Lomo Sprocket Rocket has a roll of Fujifilm Superia 800, 24 exposure, Color 35mm in it.

The Holga 120N is ready to go with Ilford PAN F Plus 50, Black and White, 12 exposure, 120mm.

Now all I need is for my Plantar Fasciitis to calm down for a day and hope that a little let-up in the rain that’s been falling in Central Texas happens simultaneously.

Maybe this Sunday…

A little experimentation.

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Because I can’t let well enough alone.

I figured there had to be some way to use the Fujifilm Instax SQ10 as a printer using images I’d made with other cameras. Had to be.

Internet research had initially turned up the notion that files had to be a certain type of jpeg, the most success had by saving digital images in Microsoft Paint’s jpeg format.

After a little more digging, I’d found an older review of the SQ10 that explained how loading a full rez image made using a Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 onto the hybrid instant camera via the micro-SD card would allow for printing.

Awesome. Just so happens I have a GX8.

I selected a recent macro shot I made with the GX8 and my new Olympus 12-40 ƒ2.8, pulled the micro-card out of the camera and slipped it into the adapter, copied the file from my desktop Mac, then inserted the micro-card back into the SQ10.

Sure enough, the SQ10 read the file. I fiddled with the in-camera effects a bit and printed it. Cool.

Next I wanted to see if a picture made with the Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 would work. I selected an older picture that I’d converted to black and white, went through the same transfer process, then checked to see if the SQ10 read the file. It did.

Minimal tweaking followed by printing resulted in success.

Pretty darned awesome.