Rusty shutters #28.

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Pentax ZX-5n.

April 2007.

I’d amassed a decent collection of Pentax FA lenses after acquiring the *ist D a year or so earlier. It only made sense to find a 35mm camera that could share them. I bought the Pentax ZX-5n from KEH for around US $150.

I ran about 5 rolls of film through this camera. Then it sat unused for a few years. I pulled it out recently to document here, but also intending to run some Tri-X 400 through it.

I put a new battery in it, and went to do a film-free test shot. The mirror lock-up gear failed. Totally unusable now. Bummer. Apparently a problem common with these 20+ year old cameras.

It’ll be cheaper to replace than repair. Maybe I’ll get the ZX-7. Maybe the MZ-S. No hurry. No worry.

Launched: 1997
Type: single lens reflex camera
Lens mount: Pentax KAF2
Film type: 35mm film with speeds of 25 to 5000 ISO, with auto DX, 6 to 6400 ISO manual
Metering element: Silicon photo cell
Focusing: Autofocus
Programs: Av, M, P and TV modes
Flash: Built-in, Guide number 11
Shutter: Focal plane shutter with speeds from 30 to 1/2000 sec. B, 2 to 1/2000 sec manual
Viewfinder: 0.8 magnification x 92% coverage, shutter and aperture LED display.
Power: 2x 3v CR2 battery lithium battery
Dimension WDH: 5.3in x 2.4in x 3.5in
Weight: 14.4 oz

Rusty shutters #27.

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Polaroid one600|Ultra.

January 2006.

I’m pretty sure I bought this camera at Costco. 13 years makes an old man’s memory shaky.

At any rate, it was before Polaroid stopped producing their 600 film, which was available from Costco at a not-too-terrible price. As I recall, 5 packs were less than 40 dollars US.

This guy got a lot of use before I moved on to the SX-70. I shot it around downtown San Jose and my old neighborhood in Santa Clara, CA.

Sad thing is I no longer have this camera – or if I do, I don’t know where I stashed it – but I do have a few other Polaroids that’ll use up my remaining packs of 600 film.

Body: Two-tone silver/darkgrey, pop-up
Lens: 100mm, 2 element, plastic, fixed focal length
Aperture: ƒ/2.9
Shutter speed 1/3 – 1/200sec
Flash modes: Auto mode, flash off mode, red-eye reduction
Viewfinder: LCD info screen shows flash mode, film counter and self timer status
Focus: 2 ft to infinity
Size WDH: 4.7in x 6.2in x 3.6in
Weight: 18oz

Rusty shutters #26.

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Samsung NV11.

May 2007.

I really liked this little guy and was getting a lot of use out of it. I even took it to Omaha, Nebraska. I walked all over town with it in-between attending a conference for the university. Got amazing results. I absolutely loved the user-interface and menu system.

And then one day after work I was getting out of the truck and I dropped it. It wasn’t the first time that had happened. It was the third. And final. Dead.

It came with one strap lug and a hand strap. Not my favorite set-up. I’ll never be a fan of that configuration.

Over the years, I’d occasionally scour eBay to see if anyone was selling theirs. In early November 2018 I finally found a used Samsung NV11 in near mint condition for an extremely reasonable price.

Back in the saddle, you might say.

This time ’round I attached a lanyard. Better safe than sorry… again.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size: 3648 x 2736
Display: 2.7in LCD @ 230,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 4 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.8 – 4.4
Focal Length: 7.8 – 39mm
Macro: .39in
Zoom: 5x optical
Metering: Center-weighted, multi-segment, spot
Dimensions WDH: 4.2in x .9in x 2.5in
Weight: 6.8oz
Power: Rechargeable Li-ion Battery (SLB-1137D)
Memory card: SD/MMC/SDHC

Rusty shutters #25.

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Olympus XA.

March 2006.

I’d been on Flickr a couple of years and noticed a fair amount of folks using film cameras and posting their work in film-only groups.

There was a lot of positive information about this tiny 35mm rangefinder and I just could not resist adding one to my collection.

The XA is pocket-sized with great glass and it’s just plain simple to use.

I’d only shot a couple of rolls – Fujicolor Superia 400, Ilford XP2 400 – but the results were awesome.

I could probably replace the light seals, but it works just fine as is. I’ll get out with this little guy in 2020. More black and white than color.

Film type: 35mm
Focal length: 35mm
Aperture: Manual ƒ/2.8 – ƒ/22
Focus: Manual .85ft to infinity
Shutter speeds: Auto 10sec – 1/500sec
Viewfinder: Rangefinder
Size HWD 2.6in x 4.1in x 1.6in
Weight: 7.8 oz
ASA: 25 – 800

Rusty shutters #20.

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Polaroid SX-70 Model 2.

November 2008.

I’d won an SX-70 SE Sonar OneStep (with a blue button) on eBay around a year earlier. It was working pretty well but after a good amount of use, 4-5 evenly spaced white spots started to show up in the pictures I was taking, lined up vertically and slightly left-of-center. A real bummer.

Looking for a replacement, I won this Model 2 on eBay.

It was in really good shape. The plastic was clean, and the porvair was spotless. And everything worked. I was using the Hanft-hack so I could use a few packs of my 600 stash.

I still have it. The porviar has degraded pretty badly over the years, but the camera still works.

When I went to fetch the camera for the product shot, I noticed there was an empty 600 pack in it. When I pressed the shutter – amazingly enough – the camera went through all the motions. Those batteries are incredible.

I have a few packs of 600 film left… I better get to taking pictures before my luck runs out!

Body: White plastic with brown vinyl porvair
Focusing: Split-image rangefinder
Lens: 4-element 116mm glass
Manual focus: 10.4 inches – infinity
Shutter: Electronic
Shutter speeds: 1/175th to 14 seconds
Aperture range: f/8 – f/22
Dimensions: DWH 6.89in x 3.93in x .98in

Rusty shutters #19.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100

January 2015.

Hands down, my favorite camera. I pretty much exclusively used this little guy up until its demise – the dreaded dusty sensor problem – earlier this year, and then replaced it with the same model, a NOS box directly from Panasonic.

Other than that, this shooter is just amazing.

I have the LX5. Skipped the LX7. When the LX100 came out I was immediately impressed by the fact that it had controls for manual operation on the outside of the camera, an aperture ring on the lens plus aspect ratio, shutter speeds and exposure compensation with the shutter release nestled neatly between them on top of the camera. The back of the camera is just as tidy.

The Leica ƒ/1.7 glass was an added bonus. Sharp. Plus it uses a 4/3 sensor. Huge.

I made some of my favorite pictures with this camera. Love the in-camera effects. Toy Pop, Dynamic Monochrome, and Rough Monochrome are super cool.

The LX100 is just a pleasure to use.

Resolution: 12.7 megapixels
Max image size – 4112 x 3088
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800, 25600
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.53in x 2.6in x 2.17in
Weight: 13.9 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Rusty shutters #18.

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Diana 151.

May 2006.

Lots of folks were using toy cameras around that time. There were a couple of Flickr contacts whose Diana 151 work convinced me to find one on eBay.

I seem to recall the price wasn’t too high, maybe US $40 at the time.

I haven’t run a whole lot of film through it, but this particular camera has a decent lens that’s true to the prescribed focus lengths, plus it came with a weathered manual, and a lens cap. I don’t know what happened to the original box.

To eliminate light leaks, I’ve made small removable flaps using gaffer’s to cover the red picture number window and the latch at the bottom of the camera back.

These cameras make the most magical images. Check out Nancy Rexroth’s work.

I’ll be getting out with this little gem again in the near future.

Film type: 120
Exposures: 16 @ 4×4
Shutter Speeds: ~1/50 – 1/100 sec
Aperture: ƒ/11, ƒ/13, ƒ/19
Focal Length: ~60mm
Viewfinder: Optical
Focusing: Manual/zone – 4-6 ft, 6-12 ft, 12 – infinity
Dimensions: 5.3in x 3.7in x 6.8in

Rusty shutters #15.

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Pentax K10D.

January 2008.

It was the next logical step, and my last Pentax DSLR before making the move to Micro Four Thirds.

With plenty of Pentax glass in my collection when the K10D was announced, I still had a lot of miles left in my *ist D and wasn’t in any hurry to make the upgrade.

So I waited nearly two years after its realease before adding the K10D to my kit.

It’s a bit bigger physically than the *ist D, but comfortable gripping with my right hand.

I added a couple of Sigma primes, the 30mm ƒ/1.4 and the 28mm ƒ/1.8 macro, and the Lensbaby Composer Pro Sweet 35 combo. I get a lot of use of these 3 lenses, plus a very big and heavy Sigma 27-70mm ƒ/2.8 macro. I also have the SMC Pentax-FA 50mm ƒ/1.4.

I still take this rig out. This and the *ist D both have a special place in my collection.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size – 3872 x 2592
Display: 2.5in LCD @ 210,000 pixels
ISO: 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 30 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Center-weighted, evaluative, spot
Dimensions: 5.6in x 4in x 2.8in
Weight: 1.57 lbs
Power: Pentax D-Li50 lithium ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/MMC/SDHC

Rusty shutters #14.

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Olympus 35 RC.

March 2008.

To be honest, this camera was an impulse eBay buy. I’ve only run one roll of fill through it, a 24 exposure roll of Kodak 160T that I had cross processed.

One good thing about this project is that I’m digging out all these old cameras and playing with them. I recently ordered (and quickly received) a set of replacement light seals and plan to put this camera back in commission soon.

It’s small and light, uses 35mm film, and has a 40mm ƒ/2.8 lens. What’s not to like?

Film type: 35mm
Weight: 14.5 oz
Lens: E. Zuiko 40mm ƒ/2.8 – ƒ/22
Focus: 3′ to infinity
Filter size: 43.5
Shutter speeds: B, 1/15 – 1/500
Viewfinder: Rangefinder
ASA: 25 – 800

Rusty shutters #13.

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Fujifilm X100S.

July 2013.

As soon as it was released, I’d had my eye on the X100 but wasn’t ready to make the purchase.

And then when I was ready, Fukishima happened. So I waited some more, which turned out to be a good thing, because I was able to get my hands on the X100S, its successor.

The X100S is a classic camera in its look, it’s feel, and its operation. Everything you need to operate in full manual mode is available on the outside of the camera. I love that.

The Fujifilm menu system is one of my faves. It’s intuitive and just plain simple to use.

All the buttons and dials on the camera are easy to access and add greatly to the functionality of this camera. Smooth.

The only issue I had was holding the camera comfortably, but a silver LensMate thumb rest took care of that problem.

Plus I added a black Gariz half-case and the silver JJC lens shade.

Fun camera.

Resolution: 16 megapixels
Max image size: 4896 x 3264
Display: 2.8in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
Viewfinder: Electronic and optical, 2,350,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 00 sec – 1/4000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 35mm
Macro: 3.94in
Metering: Multi-segment, average, spot
Dimensions: 5in x 2.91in x 2.13in
Power: Lithium-Ion NP-95 rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC