Rusty shutters #34.

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Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 III.

May 2019.

I wanted to bring a few point-and-shoot cameras on our 2-week tour of Portugal and Spain last year, but they had to be small enough to fit in the awesome Peak Design Everyday Sling 5L.

The RX100III was one of three that made the trip.

I like this little shooter a lot. My fave parts are the flip-up LCD, the Zeiss 24-70mm ƒ/1.8 lens, and the lens ring. The macro’s not bad, either.

The camera’s menu system is just okay and the controls are nicely arranged, so using the camera is pretty much a breeze.

I like this little shooter a lot.

I don’t use the viewfinder. No real need. Plus it has the nasty habit of turning off the camera when pushed back into the body.

I added a tasteful Gariz half-case and – since I’m not a big fan of wrist straps – I use an extra neck strap I had, a super-thin Panny with plastic clip/nylon cord connectors. Works perfectly.

Great little digital camera.

Resolution: 20.1 megapixels
Max image size – 5472 x 3648
Display: Tilting 3in LCD @ 1,228,800 pixels
ISO: Auto, 125, 160, 200, 250, 320, 400, 500, 640, 800, 1000, 1250, 1600, 2000, 2500, 3200, 4000, 5000, 6400, 8000, 10000, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 30 sec – 1/2000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Focal Length: 24-70mm
Macro: 1.97in
Dimensions WHD: 4in x 2.3in x 1.6in
Weight: 9.28 oz
Power: Sony NP-BX1 lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Rusty shutters #31.

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Olympus Stylus Epic.

February 2008.

I know I bought this camera new, but I can’t recall where I got it. I could find no evidence of purchases online at the usual vendors. I may have bought this at a brick and mortar store in Silicon Valley, likely San Jose Camera or Keeble and Schucat.

It’s a fun little 35mm film camera. So compact, it’ll fit in a shirt pocket. And with the ƒ/2.8 lens and high ISO capability, it performs well in all types of light.

The only bother with this camera is that every time the cover is opened/closed the camera resets to default settings and the flash is enabled.

Other than that, it’s a pretty cool little shooter.

Film type: 35mm
Weight: 4.7 oz
Lens: E. Zuiko 35mm
Aperture: ƒ/11 – ƒ2.8
Focus: 13.8in – infinity
Shutter speeds: 4 – 1/1000sec
Film advance: Automatic
Viewfinder: Real image rangefinder
ISO: DX-coded, 50 – 3200
Dimensions WHD: 4.3in x 2.3in x 1.5in
Battery: CR123A 3V Lithium

Rusty shutters #30.

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Canon Canonet QL17 G-III.

January 2006.

A good looking little rangefinder, the GIII is the last, high-end version of Canon’s famous Canonet compact cameras.

Mine was yet another eBay find. It had been CLAd and came with new seals at the time of purchase.

Great glass, fast ƒ/1.7, and the quick load feature all add up to an awesome camera.

This nearly 50 year old camera is still working. Nice little shooter.

Film type: 35mm
ISO: 25 – 800
Lens: 40mm f/1.7
Shutter speeds: 1/4 to 1/500sec and B
Focus: 2.6ft to infinity
Viewfinder: Coupled rangefinder with auto parallax correction
Battery: Originally powered by one 1.35V M20 (#625) mercury battery. Battery checker built-in.
Flash: Hot shoe
Size HWD 2.9in x 4.7in x 2.3in
Weight: 22.4oz
Canon Quick Load (QL) film loading system

Rusty shutters #29.

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Nikon One•Touch Zoom 90 AFQD.

My recollection is shaky, but I believe my wife and I bought this little guy to replace the original One•Touch we owned. We’re talkin’ right around the time I got my first digital camera, 1999-2000.

Sadly, this Z90AFQD apparently didn’t get a whole lot of use – one of the pictures on the roll of Kodak Gold 200 that was in it I recently had processed/prints made from revealed a shot from close to 10 years ago.

It still works and is a really cool little shooter, though. Easy to use, nice viewfinder. Zoom is useful. I like it. I’ve already run a couple of rolls through it.

Lens: 38-90mm (f/4.8-10.5) with macro capability as close as 12 inches
Flash: Built-in with 5 modes, including slow-synch
LCD: Frame counter, modes and date function
Viewfinder: Zooming with LEDs and dioptre correction
Film: 35mm auto-loading, winding and rewinding of DX-coded film 50-3200 ISO
Timer: Built-in 10 second self timer
Power: 3V CR123A lithium battery

 

Rusty shutters #26.

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Samsung NV11.

May 2007.

I really liked this little guy and was getting a lot of use out of it. I even took it to Omaha, Nebraska. I walked all over town with it in-between attending a conference for the university. Got amazing results. I absolutely loved the user-interface and menu system.

And then one day after work I was getting out of the truck and I dropped it. It wasn’t the first time that had happened. It was the third. And final. Dead.

It came with one strap lug and a hand strap. Not my favorite set-up. I’ll never be a fan of that configuration.

Over the years, I’d occasionally scour eBay to see if anyone was selling theirs. In early November 2018 I finally found a used Samsung NV11 in near mint condition for an extremely reasonable price.

Back in the saddle, you might say.

This time ’round I attached a lanyard. Better safe than sorry… again.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size: 3648 x 2736
Display: 2.7in LCD @ 230,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 4 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.8 – 4.4
Focal Length: 7.8 – 39mm
Macro: .39in
Zoom: 5x optical
Metering: Center-weighted, multi-segment, spot
Dimensions WDH: 4.2in x .9in x 2.5in
Weight: 6.8oz
Power: Rechargeable Li-ion Battery (SLB-1137D)
Memory card: SD/MMC/SDHC

Rusty shutters #23.

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Olympus Stylus XZ-2.

March 2019.

The XZ-2 was originally released in November 2012.

I got this little gem for travel. It’s a factory refurb I purchased off eBay for less than $300 and for an 8 year old camera, it’s actually a quite nice compact point-and-shoot.

The first thing I did was update the firmware. Then I added the VF-4 electronic viewfinder and the LC-63A lens cap.

Using this camera for the last 9 months has helped me come to terms with the Olympus user interface.

The articulating LCD is awesome. The controls on the back of the camera are well placed and intuitive, although I have accidentally hit the video button a few times.

The extremely versatile 28-112mm lens produces sharp images. The XZ-2 has great macro capability and the auto focus is super-quick.

It’s a cool little shooter.

Resolution: 12 megapixels
Max image size – 3968 x 2976
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 920,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/2000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.45in x 2.56in x 1.89in
Weight: 12.2 oz
Power: Lithium-ion Li-90B rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Rusty shutters #14.

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Olympus 35 RC.

March 2008.

To be honest, this camera was an impulse eBay buy. I’ve only run one roll of fill through it, a 24 exposure roll of Kodak 160T that I had cross processed.

One good thing about this project is that I’m digging out all these old cameras and playing with them. I recently ordered (and quickly received) a set of replacement light seals and plan to put this camera back in commission soon.

It’s small and light, uses 35mm film, and has a 40mm ƒ/2.8 lens. What’s not to like?

Film type: 35mm
Weight: 14.5 oz
Lens: E. Zuiko 40mm ƒ/2.8 – ƒ/22
Focus: 3′ to infinity
Filter size: 43.5
Shutter speeds: B, 1/15 – 1/500
Viewfinder: Rangefinder
ASA: 25 – 800