Rusty shutters #17.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX1.

July 2013.

The only reason this camera is in my collection is because I spotted it on Amazon – body only – for $199, and even though it’d been released a year earlier, that price was just too good to pass up. I added the DMW-LVF2.

I mostly use the Panasonic Lumix G 14mm f/2.5 ASPH Lens on this camera, but also use the 20mm and the Thingyfy Pinhole Pro S11.

Great little camera.

Resolution: 16 megapixels
Max image size – 4592 x 3448
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.58in x 2.67in x 1.55in
Weight: 11.2 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

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Rusty shutters #16.

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Polaroid Colorpack II.

April 2008.

Funny story. I bought five of these cameras on eBay to cut up and make into pinhole (pinholaroid) cameras. Two pinholes got made. The other two Colorpacks were junk.

But one Colorpack II was in such good condition that I just couldn’t bring myself to altering it. So I kept it as is.

I still have it. Great little camera. I should use up some of the remaining Fuji peel-apart I have stashed. Maybe when the weather gets a little cooler, this Fall.

Film: Peel-apart 100-Series or Fujifilm FP-100C, FP100B, or FP3000B
Lens: 114mm, f/9.2
Shutter: Electronic, 10s-1/500s
ISO: 75 & 3000
Focus: 3 feet to infinity
Batteries: Two standard 1.5V AA batteries
Cold clip included

Rusty shutters #14.

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Olympus 35 RC.

March 2008.

To be honest, this camera was an impulse eBay buy. I’ve only run one roll of fill through it, a 24 exposure roll of Kodak 160T that I had cross processed.

One good thing about this project is that I’m digging out all these old cameras and playing with them. I recently ordered (and quickly received) a set of replacement light seals and plan to put this camera back in commission soon.

It’s small and light, uses 35mm film, and has a 40mm ƒ/2.8 lens. What’s not to like?

Film type: 35mm
Weight: 14.5 oz
Lens: E. Zuiko 40mm ƒ/2.8 – ƒ/22
Focus: 3′ to infinity
Filter size: 43.5
Shutter speeds: B, 1/15 – 1/500
Viewfinder: Rangefinder
ASA: 25 – 800

Rusty shutters #13.

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Fujifilm X100S.

July 2013.

As soon as it was released, I’d had my eye on the X100 but wasn’t ready to make the purchase.

And then when I was ready, Fukishima happened. So I waited some more, which turned out to be a good thing, because I was able to get my hands on the X100S, its successor.

The X100S is a classic camera in its look, it’s feel, and its operation. Everything you need to operate in full manual mode is available on the outside of the camera. I love that.

The Fujifilm menu system is one of my faves. It’s intuitive and just plain simple to use.

All the buttons and dials on the camera are easy to access and add greatly to the functionality of this camera. Smooth.

The only issue I had was holding the camera comfortably, but a silver LensMate thumb rest took care of that problem.

Plus I added a black Gariz half-case and the silver JJC lens shade.

Fun camera.

Resolution: 16 megapixels
Max image size: 4896 x 3264
Display: 2.8in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
Viewfinder: Electronic and optical, 2,350,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 00 sec – 1/4000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 35mm
Macro: 3.94in
Metering: Multi-segment, average, spot
Dimensions: 5in x 2.91in x 2.13in
Power: Lithium-Ion NP-95 rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Rusty shutters #8.

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Olympus E-PL3.

October 2011.

This camera holds a lot of awesome memories.

The E-PL3 was a gift. Or rather a reward, I suppose.

When I worked at Santa Clara University I was chosen as what amounts to the 2011 “Employee of the Year” for our division. I didn’t see it coming and being chosen totally blew me away. Something I’ll always remember and cherish.

There was also a cash bonus that came along with the award. Nice.

Torri and me planned a trip to Italy, happening later that same year, and I wanted to bring along a new digital camera.

The bonus from the award paid for the E-PL3. It got plenty of use on the trip.

I chose the E-PL3 over the Olympus PEN E-P3 because of the sleek, more modern appearance – they’re essentially the same camera.

I added the Franiac grip and the versatile VF-2 viewfinder, but one of my favorite features is the flip-up rear display. So handy.

The Olympus 17mm ƒ/2.8 gets the most use, but I have a healthy collection of M43 lenses and have used the Lensbaby Composer Pro/Sweet 35 combo and the 25mm ƒ/1.4 Pentax CCTV lens on this camera.

The Olympus menu system isn’t my fave, but I manage to get around without too much trouble.

This is definitely one of my fave shooters that still gets a lot of use.

Resolution: 12.3 megapixels
Max image size – 4032 x 3024
Display: 3in LCD @ 153,000 pixels
ISO: 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.3in x 2.5in x 1.5in
Weight: 9.35 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

 

Rusty shutters #4.

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Polaroid Spectra System AF.

I haven’t used this camera a whole lot. Finding useable film on eBay wasn’t an issue when I first got this camera back in 2006, and I only went through a few packs using this cool shooter.

I’d like to use it again, but the time just isn’t right. Polaroid Originals stopped producing film for this camera for a short while, apparently because of issues with the film jamming at ejection, so I’m reluctant to spend any money on what amounts to an experiment with their pricy film.

First released in 1986 and simple enough to use, a majority of the Spectra AF’s controls are located at the back of the camera. Among them, switches for autofocus off/on, flash off/on, and exposure compensation. The sonar auto focus could be tricky at times.

The viewfinder is positioned at the back of the camera on the left side and the shutter release is located top right, just above the picture counter.

The right side of the camera has an adjustable hand strap that makes it easy and secure to hold the camera and access the shutter release.

I like the images I made with this camera, and although I haven’t used it in quite a while, the Spectra AF is still in my collection.

Image size – 3.6in x 2.8in
Film size – 4in x 4.1in
ISO: 640
Shutter Speeds: 2.8 sec – 1/250 sec
Aperture: ƒ/10
Focal Length: 125mm
Dimensions: 5.3in x 3.7in x 6.8in

 

Rusty shutters #3.

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Canon Powershot S3IS.

The Canon Powershot S3IS is a smallish digital point and shoot camera that I added to my collection in late 2006, nearly 13 years ago.

The digital camera is equipped with a substantial, yet comfortable grip, a swing-out/swivel display, and awesome zoom capability. The S3IS has amazing macro, too.

I used the S3IS for a couple of years, in between a bunch of old film cameras that I’ll highlight in weeks to come.

My sister is using this camera now.

Resolution: 6 megapixels
Max image size – 2816 x 2112
Display: 2in LCD @ 115,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800
Shutter Speeds: 15 sec – 1/3200 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.7–3.5
Focal Length: 36–432mm
Macro: .39in
Metering: Evaluative, center-weighted average, spot
Dimensions: 4.45in x 3.07in x 2.99in
Weight: 14.5 oz
Power: 4 AA batteries
Memory card: SD/SDHC