Rusty shutters #27.

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Polaroid one600|Ultra.

January 2006.

I’m pretty sure I bought this camera at Costco. 13 years makes an old man’s memory shaky.

At any rate, it was before Polaroid stopped producing their 600 film, which was available from Costco at a not-too-terrible price. As I recall, 5 packs were less than 40 dollars US.

This guy got a lot of use before I moved on to the SX-70. I shot it around downtown San Jose and my old neighborhood in Santa Clara, CA.

Sad thing is I no longer have this camera – or if I do, I don’t know where I stashed it – but I do have a few other Polaroids that’ll use up my remaining packs of 600 film.

Body: Two-tone silver/darkgrey, pop-up
Lens: 100mm, 2 element, plastic, fixed focal length
Aperture: ƒ/2.9
Shutter speed 1/3 – 1/200sec
Flash modes: Auto mode, flash off mode, red-eye reduction
Viewfinder: LCD info screen shows flash mode, film counter and self timer status
Focus: 2 ft to infinity
Size WDH: 4.7in x 6.2in x 3.6in
Weight: 18oz

Make it yourself.

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Large Format Notebook.

Here’s a little hand-made project I just finished. It’s a paper log for keeping track of large format images. A useful record keeping tool while out shooting with the Shen Hao.

The 4.25″ x 5.5″ booklet has a cover, a title page, 24 log pages, and 2 pages for notes.

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I saw a nifty product online called Analogbook and thought about making something myself, simpler and tailored for my specific needs.

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The booklet was easy to produce, with most supplies on hand and a few Adobe Illustrator files, although to be honest I did spend $13 on a long-reach stapler to bind them.

Nothin’ fancy, but quite functional.

Rusty shutters #25.

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Olympus XA.

March 2006.

I’d been on Flickr a couple of years and noticed a fair amount of folks using film cameras and posting their work in film-only groups.

There was a lot of positive information about this tiny 35mm rangefinder and I just could not resist adding one to my collection.

The XA is pocket-sized with great glass and it’s just plain simple to use.

I’d only shot a couple of rolls – Fujicolor Superia 400, Ilford XP2 400 – but the results were awesome.

I could probably replace the light seals, but it works just fine as is. I’ll get out with this little guy in 2020. More black and white than color.

Film type: 35mm
Focal length: 35mm
Aperture: Manual ƒ/2.8 – ƒ/22
Focus: Manual .85ft to infinity
Shutter speeds: Auto 10sec – 1/500sec
Viewfinder: Rangefinder
Size HWD 2.6in x 4.1in x 1.6in
Weight: 7.8 oz
ASA: 25 – 800

Because one is never enough.

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My light meter collection.

Left-to-right: Minolta Spotmeter F (newest, as recently posted), Minolta Auto Meter IV F, (I’ve had this one the longest), Gossen Luna Pro (yard sale find), Sekonic Flashmate L-308s, Sekonic Twinmate L-208.

After posting about the Spotmeter F, I thought to round up all my meters and document yet another of my many photographic obsessions.

All these meters were purchased for use when shooting film.

I bought the Minolta Auto Meter IV F back in the mid-90s, not long after it was released. Great little incident meter. If memory serves, I bought it at Keeble & Shuchat Photography in Palo Alto, CA.

The Luna Pro was part of a bunch of gear and expired film I purchased at an estate sale in Sunnyvale, CA. for US $22.50. Not bad, and it works.

The L-308 was added in June 2009. Another nice incident meter, a little smaller than the Auto Meter IV F.

I bought the tiny L-208 in August 2008.

All four incident meters can be used as spot meters, too. Just move the white globe out of the way of the sensor and point at the subject,

 

Rusty shutters #24.

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Fujifilm Instax Square SQ10.

June 2017.

A lot of photo review sites panned the Fujifilm Instax SQ10, but I really like this funky little shooter. A hybrid digital/film instant camera just made sense to me.

I like the fact that you can shoot first, print later. Makes for fewer wasted shots and that, in my opinion, saves money.

IQ is what it is. I did a side-by-side comparison of photos made with the SQ6 (which I’ll feature in the near future) and I’d be hard pressed to tell the difference. Plus, the LED display on the back of the SQ10 makes framing a shot super convenient. You see what you’re getting in realtime.

From vignetting to a number of creative filters and brightness adjustment, the SQ10 makes tweaking shots easy. It even does double exposures and the quick auto-focus is nice.

Along with 35mm and 120 cameras, I carry the SQ10 plus an extra pack of film in my film-only camera bag. Its small footprint makes it an easy choice to always have at the ready.

I like this little guy lots.

Resolution: 3.7 megapixels
Film size: 3.3 x 2.8in
Image size: 2.4 x 2.4in
Display: 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto (100-1600)
Shutter Speeds: 10 sec – 1/29500 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 28.5mm
Macro: 3.9 in
Metering: Multi-segment
Dimensions: 4.1in x 2.3in x 1.3in
Weight: 15.9 oz
Power: Fujifilm NP-50 lithium ion – MicroUSB charging
Memory card: MicroSD/SDHC card
Size WDH: 4.7 x 1.9 x 5in

Ready to roll.

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It sure took long enough.

I finished shooting these four rolls of C-41. Finally.

I’m still deciding who’ll do the processing. There’s a nearby shop, Austin Camera, on Burnet Road. It’s a little over 20 miles and a half-hour away.

Another possibility is Old School Photo Lab, they’re located in Dover, New Hampshire. I’d be sending them the rolls via their free pre-paid mailing label. I used them for the roll of XP2 I shot earlier this year at the Civil War reenactment at Camp Mabry. The Shitty Camera Challenge.

My main concern is the Fuji 800 roll. It’s out of the Sprocket Rocket and I want to make sure the negatives don’t get cut in the middle of pictures.

The XP2 Super and Gold 200 were in my Nikon One•Touch Zoom 90. The Ektar 100 was in my Olympus Stylus Epic.

Decisions, decisions.

Could not resist.

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5 seconds.

I won this absolutely mint Minolta Spotmeter F in auction on eBay last week, it showed up in the mail yesterday.

Compared to what they go for if purchased from Japan, I got a really good deal.

Happy to report the meter is in fine working order.

I even managed to out-bid a few other folks and won it with only 5 seconds left. That can be tricky, as I’ve lost more than I’ve won using that particular strategy.

It came with a strap, a lens cap, and a case. All pristine. Happy to report the meter is in fine working order.

I was even able to download and print an English version of the manual from Michael Butkus’ Film Camera Manual Site.

Now I need to get Ansel Adams’ The Negative to complete my education on zone metering.