Rusty shutters #31.

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Olympus Stylus Epic.

February 2008.

I know I bought this camera new, but I can’t recall where I got it. I could find no evidence of purchases online at the usual vendors. I may have bought this at a brick and mortar store in Silicon Valley, likely San Jose Camera or Keeble and Schucat.

It’s a fun little 35mm film camera. So compact, it’ll fit in a shirt pocket. And with the ƒ/2.8 lens and high ISO capability, it performs well in all types of light.

The only bother with this camera is that every time the cover is opened/closed the camera resets to default settings and the flash is enabled.

Other than that, it’s a pretty cool little shooter.

Film type: 35mm
Weight: 4.7 oz
Lens: E. Zuiko 35mm
Aperture: ƒ/11 – ƒ2.8
Focus: 13.8in – infinity
Shutter speeds: 4 – 1/1000sec
Film advance: Automatic
Viewfinder: Real image rangefinder
ISO: DX-coded, 50 – 3200
Dimensions WHD: 4.3in x 2.3in x 1.5in
Battery: CR123A 3V Lithium

Rusty shutters #30.

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Canon Canonet QL17 G-III.

January 2006.

A good looking little rangefinder, the GIII is the last, high-end version of Canon’s famous Canonet compact cameras.

Mine was yet another eBay find. It had been CLAd and came with new seals at the time of purchase.

Great glass, fast ƒ/1.7, and the quick load feature all add up to an awesome camera.

This nearly 50 year old camera is still working. Nice little shooter.

Film type: 35mm
ISO: 25 – 800
Lens: 40mm f/1.7
Shutter speeds: 1/4 to 1/500sec and B
Focus: 2.6ft to infinity
Viewfinder: Coupled rangefinder with auto parallax correction
Battery: Originally powered by one 1.35V M20 (#625) mercury battery. Battery checker built-in.
Flash: Hot shoe
Size HWD 2.9in x 4.7in x 2.3in
Weight: 22.4oz
Canon Quick Load (QL) film loading system

Rusty shutters #29.

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Nikon One•Touch Zoom 90 AFQD.

My recollection is shaky, but I believe my wife and I bought this little guy to replace the original One•Touch we owned. We’re talkin’ right around the time I got my first digital camera, 1999-2000.

Sadly, this Z90AFQD apparently didn’t get a whole lot of use – one of the pictures on the roll of Kodak Gold 200 that was in it I recently had processed/prints made from revealed a shot from close to 10 years ago.

It still works and is a really cool little shooter, though. Easy to use, nice viewfinder. Zoom is useful. I like it. I’ve already run a couple of rolls through it.

Lens: 38-90mm (f/4.8-10.5) with macro capability as close as 12 inches
Flash: Built-in with 5 modes, including slow-synch
LCD: Frame counter, modes and date function
Viewfinder: Zooming with LEDs and dioptre correction
Film: 35mm auto-loading, winding and rewinding of DX-coded film 50-3200 ISO
Timer: Built-in 10 second self timer
Power: 3V CR123A lithium battery

 

Walking among the dead.

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Austin’s history under foot.

I met Kevin Thomas at Oakwood Cemetery in Austin last Sunday morning for a film stroll.

It’s a place I’ve been wanting to shoot since I saw Kat Swansey’s cemetery shots in her IG stream and her recommendation for a visit to Oakwood.

Foggy and a little chilly, it started clearing around noon. The drive down I-35 wasn’t bad at all.

I brought along the Yashica-Mat 66. I loaded a roll of Tri-X 400 in it the day before. Everything seemed pretty normal. Sunday I couldn’t get the film to advance properly. Hmmm.

Also on hand was my little Instax Mini 8, and I burned through two packs of Mono Chrome. Got a coupla’ keepers.

I thought I was prepared. Apparently not!

The Minolta XG-1/24mm ƒ2.8 + mystery roll, too.

I had the Sony RX100MIII in the bag, as well. Sadly, when I tried to use it, I discovered it had a dead battery.

So, I shot bunches with the iPhone 8 and Blackie App.

I thought I was prepared. Apparently not!

It was a good 2+ hour walk.

On my way back home I stopped at Austin Camera to pick up the negs/prints from the 4 rolls of C41 I left there last Saturday. Pretty cool to see what they contained. Around 20 keepers, plus I still have to scan the shots from the Sprocket Rocket.

Rusty shutters #28.

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Pentax ZX-5n.

April 2007.

I’d amassed a decent collection of Pentax FA lenses after acquiring the *ist D a year or so earlier. It only made sense to find a 35mm camera that could share them. I bought the Pentax ZX-5n from KEH for around US $150.

I ran about 5 rolls of film through this camera. Then it sat unused for a few years. I pulled it out recently to document here, but also intending to run some Tri-X 400 through it.

I put a new battery in it, and went to do a film-free test shot. The mirror lock-up gear failed. Totally unusable now. Bummer. Apparently a problem common with these 20+ year old cameras.

It’ll be cheaper to replace than repair. Maybe I’ll get the ZX-7. Maybe the MZ-S. No hurry. No worry.

Launched: 1997
Type: single lens reflex camera
Lens mount: Pentax KAF2
Film type: 35mm film with speeds of 25 to 5000 ISO, with auto DX, 6 to 6400 ISO manual
Metering element: Silicon photo cell
Focusing: Autofocus
Programs: Av, M, P and TV modes
Flash: Built-in, Guide number 11
Shutter: Focal plane shutter with speeds from 30 to 1/2000 sec. B, 2 to 1/2000 sec manual
Viewfinder: 0.8 magnification x 92% coverage, shutter and aperture LED display.
Power: 2x 3v CR2 battery lithium battery
Dimension WDH: 5.3in x 2.4in x 3.5in
Weight: 14.4 oz

Rusty shutters #27.

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Polaroid one600|Ultra.

January 2006.

I’m pretty sure I bought this camera at Costco. 13 years makes an old man’s memory shaky.

At any rate, it was before Polaroid stopped producing their 600 film, which was available from Costco at a not-too-terrible price. As I recall, 5 packs were less than 40 dollars US.

This guy got a lot of use before I moved on to the SX-70. I shot it around downtown San Jose and my old neighborhood in Santa Clara, CA.

Sad thing is I no longer have this camera – or if I do, I don’t know where I stashed it – but I do have a few other Polaroids that’ll use up my remaining packs of 600 film.

Body: Two-tone silver/darkgrey, pop-up
Lens: 100mm, 2 element, plastic, fixed focal length
Aperture: ƒ/2.9
Shutter speed 1/3 – 1/200sec
Flash modes: Auto mode, flash off mode, red-eye reduction
Viewfinder: LCD info screen shows flash mode, film counter and self timer status
Focus: 2 ft to infinity
Size WDH: 4.7in x 6.2in x 3.6in
Weight: 18oz

Make it yourself.

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Large Format Notebook.

Here’s a little hand-made project I just finished. It’s a paper log for keeping track of large format images. A useful record keeping tool while out shooting with the Shen Hao.

The 4.25″ x 5.5″ booklet has a cover, a title page, 24 log pages, and 2 pages for notes.

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I saw a nifty product online called Analogbook and thought about making something myself, simpler and tailored for my specific needs.

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The booklet was easy to produce, with most supplies on hand and a few Adobe Illustrator files, although to be honest I did spend $13 on a long-reach stapler to bind them.

Nothin’ fancy, but quite functional.