‘Roid Week Spring 2019

Instant fun, revisited.

Torri and me have been adding a lot of color to the backyard this Spring, so it made sense that a majority of my shots for ‘Roid Week would end up being botanical in nature.

I even managed to get in a few shots from one of the local nurseries we visited.

I’ve gotta’ use up some of the Fuji peel-apart film in my stash next time around.

Here are my 12 contributions for ‘Roid Week Spring 2019, April 21-26…

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Clearly, not thinking.

thermometer.jpg

Starting all over again.

When Torri and I committed to retiring and leaving California, I made a decision about photography that, at the time, seemed sound.

After a few choppy years of on-again-off-again picking up the cameras – totally ignoring my film camera collection – I gave a bunch of my black and white film developing stuff to one of the student interns working in the office, a young lady who was pretty much just starting out as a film shooter.

She got my Paterson tank and extra reels, a dark bag, my notebook with dev charts and notes, all the little accessories that made for loading magic in that little black bag, and the plastic bucket that held it all.

I gave a bunch of my black and white film developing stuff to one of the student interns working in the office.

So, now I’m retired. And after 4 years, we’re settled into our new Texas life. I have plenty of time on my hands. I also have a decent stash of expired 120 and 35mm film, along with a bunch of old Fuji peel apart and some random other bits of film that needs to be used up.

Turns out that was definitely a hasty decision. I’m about to rebuild my film developing set-up.

Digging around in my “archive” I found an old article I snagged from the Web back in July 2006 by Justin Ouellette of (now defunct) chromogenic.net fame that explained all things required to develop black and white film for a reasonable $49.38. Step-by-step in a conversational voice.

Justin’s post was really good and it got me quickly up to speed, seeing as I hadn’t developed black and white since 1969-70!

Here’s his 2006 shopping list…

  • Kodak D-76 Developer (powder, makes 1 gallon) – $5.49
  • Kodak Fixer (powder, makes 1 gallon) – $5.19
  • Kodak Photo-Flo 200 (4 oz. bottle) – $3.95
  • Omega Universal Developing Tank w/ 2 adjustable reels – $16.95
  • Kalt Stainless Steel Film Clips (set of 2) – $3.95
  • (2) Delta Datatainer One-Gallon Chemical Storage Bottles – $2.95 each
  • Delta Datatainer 32 oz. Chemical Storage Bottle – $1.95
  • 16 oz. Funnel – $1.50
  • 20 oz. Graduated Beaker – $4.50

By comparison, here’s what these same – or close to same – items go for today, with a few things added that’ll fit my specific needs, each linked to their source…

It totals up to $192.29 – naturally, some of the items cost quite a bit more than they did in 2006!

It’s likely this list will grow…

The real deal.

Pipe and glasses

A grey (and blue) morning @ ISO 400.

It’s been a while since I’ve shot film – I don’t mean Polaroid, Fuji peel-apart, or even Instax instant stuff. I’m talkin’ real-deal film. You know, 35mm or 120 – so it felt pretty good to get some shots earlier this month to post this week for the Shitty Camera Challenge.

As mentioned in a previous post, Battleground 1863 was a pretty nifty event and I had a great time wandering around the camp. The weather was semi-cooperative, with temps in the low 50s accompanied by a misty fog. Great for ISO 400 film.

That little Argus 520 did an admirable job, all things considered. Plus it was a great conversation starter with the guys dressed in uniform for the reenactment and many of them shared stories about old cameras and camera collections.

Here are nine shots from that 24 exposure roll of XP2 Super that I’m kinda’ partial to…

 

Up early, with a twist.

Greetings

GTX Photo Fest.

6 a.m. is when I usually get up, but my normal routine includes downing a travel mug of coffee and computer time until 8-ish.

Not so today. I had to be out the door by 7:30 a.m.

Today was the 1st (and hopefully annual) Georgetown Photo Festival.

But let me back up a minute.

I decided to take only my TtV rig with me today.

It’d been a while since I shot Through the Viewfinder and I thought this event would be a perfect fit. Last night I spent a good two hours getting my gear ready – charging batteries, checking camera settings, clearing and formatting the CF card in the ol’ Pentax *ist D – so it’d be a grab-and-go kind of thing after morning coffee and such.

I was ready. And everything worked out perfectly. Wake up. Coffee. Shower. Go.

Georgetown, TX is up the road about 17 minutes, if the traffic signal gods are on my side.

I got to the town square about 10 minutes early and could see folks gathering on the east side of the courthouse. A photostroll was planned for 8-10 a.m.

The morning air was around 46º with a slight breeze out of the north. Brrr. I wore a hoody sweatshirt. Seemed enough. Really wasn’t.

I mingled with people I know from PhotwalksATX, said hello to David Valdez (one of the event organizers), then joined in as everyone congregated on the courthouse steps for a group shot.

I started walking around, and promptly lost the folks partaking in the photostroll. I kept moving and in the span of an hour I’d made about 60 TtV shots. That’s when the 4 AA batteries in the *ist D decided to go dead. Bummer.

I went back to the Escape, looking for the other set of batteries I’d packed. Sadly, they weren’t in the bag. So, I put the TtV rig back in the camera bag and locked up the truck. Then I pulled out my iPhone and headed back into the fray using the Blackie app.

After another half-hour of walking around it was getting close to 10 a.m. and my toes were cold. So I headed back to the truck and drove home.

Yup. You know where this is going… maybe I *should’ve* brought another camera. Lesson learned. Next time bring a back-up camera. Maybe two.

I got around 2 dozen decent shots in all. Here are a few of my faves…

Vintage camera ads.

Surprise finds.

I’ve been playing with art a bunch this winter. Paintings, collages, and even a little monotype. You can see my efforts on Instagram.

One of my fave resources for collage material is magazines.

There’s a store in Cedar Park that sells used books, and back in the corner of the store they have a set of shelves with all kinds of magazines. Mostly newer publications, but there’s a handful of cubbies with National Geographic mags, some dating back to the 1960s.

I picked up a few issues – a range of years – a coupla’ weeks ago, and while I was in my studio I started flipping through the 60s issues and noticed a few ads for cameras.

Pretty cool. Check ’em out…

Olympus Pen F - Vol. 126, No. 1 / June 1965

Olympus Pen F – Vol. 126, No. 1 / June 1965

Hasselblad - National Geographic Vol. 128, No. 3 / September 1965

Hasselblad – National Geographic Vol. 128, No. 3 / September 1965

Kodak Instamatic 800 - National Geographic Vol. 126, No. 1 / July 1964

Kodak Instamatic 800 – National Geographic Vol. 126, No. 1 / July 1964

Olympus Pen - National Geographic Vol. 126, No. 1 / July 1964

Olympus Pen – National Geographic Vol. 126, No. 1 / July 1964

Honeywell Pentax & Konica Auto-S - National Geographic Vol. 127 No. 6 / June 1965

Honeywell Pentax & Konica Auto-S – National Geographic Vol. 127 No. 6 / June 1965

Resurrecting my old Minolta XG 7.

xg-7-01-sized.jpg

New seals. Fresh batteries. UV filter.

I replaced the light seals in this old guy today. Total time involved was just a little over an hour.

And, of course, I spent more time scraping off the old gunky seals, removing residue, and general cleaning than I did cutting and installing the new pieces of felt and foam.

Luckily, I had everything I needed to take care of the seals without having to spend another penny.

I’m waiting for batteries and a UV filter to arrive and then it’ll be ready to see the light of day.

I’m thinkin’ a roll of 36 exposure Kodak Plus X Pan, expired 03/1992. Stoked to get out and shoot with this relic…

 

The leap.

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Worth it.

I’ve been updating my Mac system a bit lately, adding a second monitor, replacing the very old keyboard, and moving up to Apple’s Magic Mouse 2.

The MM2 is awesome. I used the previous model with my work laptop back before I retired and loved it.

The Logitech wired mouse I’ve been using on my personal system the past few years was fine, but that model was discontinued and I had an Apple wired mouse that was just okay.

So, I finally bit the bullet and paid the price for the Magic Mouse 2.

A good investment.