Rusty shutters #13.

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Fujifilm X100S.

July 2013.

As soon as it was released, I’d had my eye on the X100 but wasn’t ready to make the purchase.

And then when I was ready, Fukishima happened. So I waited some more, which turned out to be a good thing, because I was able to get my hands on the X100S, its successor.

The X100S is a classic camera in its look, it’s feel, and its operation. Everything you need to operate in full manual mode is available on the outside of the camera. I love that.

The Fujifilm menu system is one of my faves. It’s intuitive and just plain simple to use.

All the buttons and dials on the camera are easy to access and add greatly to the functionality of this camera. Smooth.

The only issue I had was holding the camera comfortably, but a silver LensMate thumb rest took care of that problem.

Plus I added a black Gariz half-case and the silver JJC lens shade.

Fun camera.

Resolution: 16 megapixels
Max image size: 4896 x 3264
Display: 2.8in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
Viewfinder: Electronic and optical, 2,350,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 00 sec – 1/4000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 35mm
Macro: 3.94in
Metering: Multi-segment, average, spot
Dimensions: 5in x 2.91in x 2.13in
Power: Lithium-Ion NP-95 rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

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Rusty shutters #12.

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Leica D-Lux 4.

June 2009.

I saw a picture of this camera in Kelly Castro’s Flickr stream, with the 24mm viewfinder. I had to have it. So cool.

And even though it’s a Leica branded clone of Panasonic’s Lumix LX-3, it’s still the only Leica I’m likely to own.

I had to add the Franiec grip. As much as I like the simplicity of design, without the grip it was hard to hold. And I also purchased that viewfinder at the same time.

It’s a great little camera with awesome macro capability. Leica glass, too. Duh.

It was my first digital camera that had a switch on the lens barrel for image size settings, and though it couldn’t shoot 1:1 when I purchased it, a firmware upgrade made that possible through the menu system.

I still use this little guy.

Resolution: 10.1 megapixels
Max image size – 3648 x 2736
Display: 3in fixed LCD @ 460,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2
Focal Length: 24-60mm
Macro: .4in
Metering: Multi, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions: 4.3in x 2.3in x 1.1in
Weight: 8 oz.
Power: Lithium Ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC

Rusty shutters #11.

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Nikon Coolpix P300.

March 2011.

One of my all-time favorite cameras is the original Nikon One•Touch 35mm ƒ/2.8, compact autofocus. We got ours brand new back in the 80s and it lasted well into the 90s before it died. It was a simple, easy to use camera that made great pictures. I was heartbroken when it stopped working.

The Nikon Coolpix P300 has that same simple feel. I was drawn to it because it’s such a basic little pocket camera. Super easy to use, feels good in the hand, and has a small, but useful, built-in finger grip on the front and a thumb grip on the back. The LCD display fills the back of the camera and controls are minimal.

I shoot in aperture-priority mode, and ƒ-stops are easy to change using the rotary multi-selector on the back of the camera.

This little point and shoot produces really great images.

Resolution: 12 megapixels
Max image size – 4000 x 3000
Display: 3in LCD @ 921,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 2000, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 8 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/1.8-4.9
Focal Length: 24-100mm
Macro: 1.2in
Metering: center-weighted, multi-segment
Dimensions: 4.1in x 2.3in x 1.3in
Weight: 6.7 oz
Power: Rechargeable Li-ion Battery (EN-EL12)
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Use what you have.

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Spot on.

I’m not quite ready to pull the trigger on a full-blown spot meter.

The model I’m interested in, the Minolta Spot Meter F, has a price range of roughly $100-$300 US on eBay depending on condition, seller, and shipping.

I spotted (!) another option on eBay. It’s the Minolta Viewfinder II 10 Degree Spot attachment for their Minolta Auto Meter IV F. It just so happens that I have one of those little gems. The Auto Meter IV has been in my kit for many a year.

The attachment goes for around $50. I figured it’d be a good investment and learning tool. There were enough decent reviews in forums to convince me to give it a try and since the cost was reasonable, I went for it.

I’ll look into a Spot Meter F again next year, but for now I think this attachment will be useful.

I’ll be loading up the 4×5 film holders with Fomopan 100.

I’m looking forward to getting out with the Shen Hao.

Rusty shutters #10.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1.

December 2009.

This camera was a game changer for me.

My first mirrorless, it’s a super-nifty little Micro Four Thirds camera and along with the 20mm ƒ/1.7 lens, I made bunches of nice images with this little gem.

I first heard of this camera through Craig Mod’s blog post titled “GF1 Fieldtest – 16 Days in the Himalayas.” His detailed review, high praise, and the gorgeous photos he shared were all hard to ignore.

The first time I held one and fiddled with it was early December 2009 while attending a photo meet-up in Santa Clara, at the coffee shop across El Camino Real from Santa Clara University’s Loyola Hall.

One of the folks attending brought along his recently acquired GF1/20mm ƒ/1.7 and was kind enough to let me hold it and play with it a bit.

The minute I pressed the shutter release I was hooked – it made a convincing click-thunk sound – you knew you’d just made a picture.

The GF1 is so cool. Small, 12 megapixels, used interchangeable Panasonic and Olympus lenses, quick auto-focus, a 3″ display, and an external viewfinder could be added.

I’ve even attached a Lensbaby Composer Pro/Sweet 35, the Pentax 25mm ƒ/1.4 CCTV, and the Wanderlust Pinwide. Pictured is the Panasonic 14mm ƒ/2.5, a nice street lens.

By Christmas I had one of my own, along with the 20mm ƒ1.7 and the EVF.

Some of my fave portraits were made with this little guy and I’ve shot a lot of cool cars and beautiful flowers with it, too.

Resolution: 12.1 megapixels
Max image size – 4000 x 3000
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.69in x 2.8in x 1.43in
Weight: 13.58 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/MMC

Rusty shutters #9.

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Hasselblad 500C/M.

May 2006.

I bought this camera, and the accompanying Zeiss Sonnar 1:4 150mm T*, from my neighbor at the time. Along with it came an early edition of Ernst Wildi’s The Hasselblad Manual and a healthy stack of Hassy promotional material. I still have all of it.

I added the #10 extension tube, the 80mm ƒ/2.8 Planar lens (plus the plastic Hassy branded bay 50 lens hood), and the more modern looking PM45 prism viewfinder.

The camera is pristine. No flaws whatsoever. I keep it in its own Domke bag for protection.

The camera’s distinctive slap sound at shutter release is one of my favorite things about this shooter.

I use the 80mm lens most. It makes amazing photographs.

Film type: 120
Film back: A12
Viewfinder: prism
Winding Mechanism: manual crank
Body construction: aluminum alloy
Dimensions: 4.7in x 6.8in x 6.8in

Rusty shutters #8.

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Olympus E-PL3.

October 2011.

This camera holds a lot of awesome memories.

The E-PL3 was a gift. Or rather a reward, I suppose.

When I worked at Santa Clara University I was chosen as what amounts to the 2011 “Employee of the Year” for our division. I didn’t see it coming and being chosen totally blew me away. Something I’ll always remember and cherish.

There was also a cash bonus that came along with the award. Nice.

Torri and me planned a trip to Italy, happening later that same year, and I wanted to bring along a new digital camera.

The bonus from the award paid for the E-PL3. It got plenty of use on the trip.

I chose the E-PL3 over the Olympus PEN E-P3 because of the sleek, more modern appearance – they’re essentially the same camera.

I added the Franiac grip and the versatile VF-2 viewfinder, but one of my favorite features is the flip-up rear display. So handy.

The Olympus 17mm ƒ/2.8 gets the most use, but I have a healthy collection of M43 lenses and have used the Lensbaby Composer Pro/Sweet 35 combo and the 25mm ƒ/1.4 Pentax CCTV lens on this camera.

The Olympus menu system isn’t my fave, but I manage to get around without too much trouble.

This is definitely one of my fave shooters that still gets a lot of use.

Resolution: 12.3 megapixels
Max image size – 4032 x 3024
Display: 3in LCD @ 153,000 pixels
ISO: 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.3in x 2.5in x 1.5in
Weight: 9.35 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC