Rusty shutters #5.

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Ricoh GR Digital II

Fun little camera.

Tiny. Killer. Awesome macro.

Love the 1:1 format, the GRD2 was my first digital with that option and boy did I abuse it. This is a couple of years before Instagram launched.

Love the B&W.

Love the 28mm.

Acquired new mid-2008, I’ve even got the little GV-2 add-on viewfinder, the wide-angle adapter and lens, the external cable/switch, and the AC adapter.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size – 3648 x 2736
Display: 2.7in LCD @ 230,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 180 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 28mm
Macro: .6in
Metering: Multi-segment, spot
Dimensions: 4.2in x 2.3in x 1.0in
Power: Li-Ion battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC

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Creativity.

Paper and Light

Ideas, influence, and inspiration.

The co-founder of The North Austin Pfotographic Society, Josh Baker, gave a super-animated prezzy on creativity at last night’s monthly meeting.

There were a lot of great take-aways, from his use of storyboards and sketches, knowing and breaking rules, to taking advantage of spontaneous situations. Josh’s work is large-scale, and he talked about all the planning that kind of photography demands.

At a couple of points in the presentation, he spoke briefly about inspiration, which I think could be the subject of a whole ‘nutha meeting.

It was an excellent talk!

I do think we’re all influenced by our surroundings, and by filling my life with things I love, the work I do is a direct reflection of my interests.

Plus, my interest in photography is more out of curiosity and experimentation – not business – so I tend to look at things on a much smaller scale. I’m not saying big is bad, I just don’t have the budget, the gear, or the network a working professional has.

But small scale doesn’t mean you can’t be creative.

In September of 2005, I enjoyed an exhibition at San Jose Museum of Art titled “Caja de Visiones/Box of Visions: Manuel Álvarez Bravo.” It was wonderful. The show included about 50 black-and-white photographs.

There were a couple of Álvarez Bravo’s images that I found to be so totally different from the the rest of the exhibit, almost out of place, but demonstrated a playful side. They were pictures of paper, folded and bent.

I was excited to try something similar using a Lensbaby 2 that I’d added to my kit. I’d done a series of macros of a plastic rainbow Slinky earlier that Summer and was happy with the results.

Wash machine

One evening I ventured out to the garage with my camera, the Lensbaby, a small LED flashlight, and this idea.

Working on top of our wash machine, I cut a 3/8″ x 14″ piece of layout bond and curled it tightly around an exacto knife handle, let it fall on a piece of black construction paper and made some slight adjustments to the arrangement.

I then pointed an LED flashlight from various angles at the resulting composition and pulled the Lensbaby away from the camera body to get a closer crop.

The experiment was a success.

Of the eleven images made, I had three of them printed, matted, and framed.

Paper and Light 1

Paper and Light 3

Paper and Light 3

Clearly, not thinking.

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Starting all over again.

When Torri and I committed to retiring and leaving California, I made a decision about photography that, at the time, seemed sound.

After a few choppy years of on-again-off-again picking up the cameras – totally ignoring my film camera collection – I gave a bunch of my black and white film developing stuff to one of the student interns working in the office, a young lady who was pretty much just starting out as a film shooter.

She got my Paterson tank and extra reels, a dark bag, my notebook with dev charts and notes, all the little accessories that made for loading magic in that little black bag, and the plastic bucket that held it all.

I gave a bunch of my black and white film developing stuff to one of the student interns working in the office.

So, now I’m retired. And after 4 years, we’re settled into our new Texas life. I have plenty of time on my hands. I also have a decent stash of expired 120 and 35mm film, along with a bunch of old Fuji peel apart and some random other bits of film that needs to be used up.

Turns out that was definitely a hasty decision. I’m about to rebuild my film developing set-up.

Digging around in my “archive” I found an old article I snagged from the Web back in July 2006 by Justin Ouellette of (now defunct) chromogenic.net fame that explained all things required to develop black and white film for a reasonable $49.38. Step-by-step in a conversational voice.

Justin’s post was really good and it got me quickly up to speed, seeing as I hadn’t developed black and white since 1969-70!

Here’s his 2006 shopping list…

  • Kodak D-76 Developer (powder, makes 1 gallon) – $5.49
  • Kodak Fixer (powder, makes 1 gallon) – $5.19
  • Kodak Photo-Flo 200 (4 oz. bottle) – $3.95
  • Omega Universal Developing Tank w/ 2 adjustable reels – $16.95
  • Kalt Stainless Steel Film Clips (set of 2) – $3.95
  • (2) Delta Datatainer One-Gallon Chemical Storage Bottles – $2.95 each
  • Delta Datatainer 32 oz. Chemical Storage Bottle – $1.95
  • 16 oz. Funnel – $1.50
  • 20 oz. Graduated Beaker – $4.50

By comparison, here’s what these same – or close to same – items go for today, with a few things added that’ll fit my specific needs, each linked to their source…

It totals up to $192.29 – naturally, some of the items cost quite a bit more than they did in 2006!

It’s likely this list will grow…

A milestone of sorts.

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Pink Rose – Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100

A metric ton of pictures.

The above photo is upload number 6,666 on Flickr. A weird little milestone, I’ll admit.

I joined Flickr on August 8, 2004. I have a pro account. It’s a great platform and I’ve enjoyed much success, made good friends, learned bunches, and experienced some amazing photography in those near fifteen years.

I follow 1,676 people. I have 2,565 followers. I’m part of some 44 groups. My work has been featured on the Flickr blog a time or two.

I’m invested. I’m not going anywhere.

Here are 20 of my Top 200 images, all time views.

Cars on film.

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13 pictures, 9 cameras, 8 different film types.

A little shameless self promotion…

I put together a short essay titled ‘Cars on Film’ about shooting cars using film cameras and the good folks at Film Shooters Collective were kind enough to publish it on their website.

Please > Give it a look, give it a read.

And while you’re there, check out the FSC Journal for a ton of great film photography.