Rusty shutters #15.

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Pentax K10D.

January 2008.

It was the next logical step, and my last Pentax DSLR before making the move to Micro Four Thirds.

With plenty of Pentax glass in my collection when the K10D was announced, I still had a lot of miles left in my *ist D and wasn’t in any hurry to make the upgrade.

So I waited nearly two years after its realease before adding the K10D to my kit.

It’s a bit bigger physically than the *ist D, but comfortable gripping with my right hand.

I added a couple of Sigma primes, the 30mm ƒ/1.4 and the 28mm ƒ/1.8 macro, and the Lensbaby Composer Pro Sweet 35 combo. I get a lot of use of these 3 lenses, plus a very big and heavy Sigma 27-70mm ƒ/2.8 macro. I also have the SMC Pentax-FA 50mm ƒ/1.4.

I still take this rig out. This and the *ist D both have a special place in my collection.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size – 3872 x 2592
Display: 2.5in LCD @ 210,000 pixels
ISO: 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 30 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Center-weighted, evaluative, spot
Dimensions: 5.6in x 4in x 2.8in
Weight: 1.57 lbs
Power: Pentax D-Li50 lithium ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/MMC/SDHC

Pail.

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… by comparison.

I shot this photo with my Panny GX8 and a Pentax 25mm ƒ/1.4 (m43 50mm equivalent) c-mount CCTV lens, ISO 200, wide-open, using the Dynamic Black and White in-camera filter. A Manfrotto 785B Modo tripod and the camera’s timer set to 2 seconds helped keep things steady. I unscrewed the center bar from the pod to make the camera sit closer to the ground. The camera was just short of 5 feet from the subject.

The only post-processing is simple auto-levels in Photoshop.

I love the swirly bokeh this little lens produces.

The setting is the north side-yard of our home, sitting on a flagstone step, beneath the shade of our neighbor’s Live Oak and you’re looking east here.

A neighbor had set this pail out next to their garbage can for pick-up one Wednesday and I spotted it on my early-morning walk. I made a point of walking back past their house to snag it on the way home.

I store charcoal in it.

I love the swirly bokeh this little lens produces. It’s a great portrait lens, as well – you just have to get up in people’s faces with it!