Every once in a great while.

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Not often, but…

Every once in a while an image I’ve made gets a little attention.

One of my pinhole images was published in SHOTS Magazine, Fall 2019 Issue No. 145 “The Journey.”

It’s 35/45, the picture I made with the Zero Image 6×9 and an expired roll of Fuji Acros 100. The story of this pinhole adventure/experiment is well documented in an earlier post.

I pointed to the same same post when I uploaded the image to Flickr.

To my delight, the picture in that post ended up on Flickr’s Explore, which is something that hasn’t happened for my work in a really long time.

I noticed it earlier this month. Any comments on Flickr are rare these days and the notification made me check it out. At the time there were 58 faves. Crazy. The comments indicated the picture made Explore.

I went there, scrolled through until I found the image. Verification! Pretty cool!

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As of today “35/45. a little experiment” has 9,121 views, 75 faves, and 4 comments.

Amazing.

I make images to satisfy a personal need, but it certainly is nice to have this kind of reaction to my work. And I appreciate it.

Ex Libris.

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Learning is never ending.

A half-dozen photography related books I’ve added to my library over the past year.

Photographers on Photography: How the Masters See, Think & Shoot
Henry Carroll

Analog Photography: Reference Manual for Shooting Film
Andrew Bellamy

A Chronology of Photography: A Cultural Timeline From Camera Obscura to Instagram
Paul Lowe

Photography Changes Everything
Marvin Heiferman

Experimental Photography: A Handbook of Techniques
Marco Antonini, Sergio Minniti, Francisco Gómez, Gabriele Lungarella, Luca Bendandi

Zen Camera: Creative Awakening with a Daily Practice in Photography
David Ulrich

Austin streets.

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A Thursday morning photowalk.

I got out for a film-shooters photowalk in Austin this morning with Chris Ullrich and Amy Jasek.

The only digital camera I had with me was my iPhone 8.

I brought a bunch of film cameras, but mostly used my recently rediscovered Nikon One•Touch Zoom 90 loaded with a 24 exposure roll of 35mm Ilford XP2 Super and my little Olympus Stylus Epic loaded with a 36 exposure roll of Kodak Ektar 100.

Chris had his awesome Leica M6, and Amy had a really slick black Contax G2.

Chris and I walked from the new-ish Austin Library to Intelligentsia Coffee at 3rd and Nueces Street to meet Amy.

After conversation, coffee, and a light breakfast, the stroll began. Cameras in hand, we headed east on 3rd street to Congress Avenue, headed north where Amy broke out her new Ondu 4×5 pinhole camera.

Crossing over around 8th , we headed back down Congress Avenue to 2nd, then winding our way west, back to the library, where – before we went our separate ways – we talked at length about the current state of the Film Shooters Collective.

Great walk. Great conversation. Great people. Great fun. I hope I got some great pictures!

 

Use what you have, revisited.

scan-comparison.jpgA little experiment.

An update on my adventures last Sunday morning with my Zero Image 6×9 pinhole camera.

I developed the Fujifilm Neopan Acros 100 that was in the camera back on Thursday, along with the *fat roll I posted about last Tuesday… more on the mystery roll soon.

Everything went smoothly with the developing. Stock D76 @ 68º for 7 minutes 15 seconds.

The negatives hung in the hall bathroom until the next day, and they were dry by the time I was ready to scan.

The Epson V500 I have has been a work horse over the years, handling everything I throw at it. But things went south from the beginning on this particular task.

Things went south from the beginning on this particular task…

There’s a white background that snaps in-and-out of the scanner lid, it’s not needed when scanning film. Took it out. Then I pulled out the 120 negative scan tray and loaded up a strip of three shots, set up the scan software per usual, and went through the process of creating a preview before actually scanning.

That’s when things started to go awry. The preview was splitting up the negatives in a way that was totally unusable.

I fiddled with every the setting I could, but the results did not change.

I remembered watching a You Tube video some time ago that showed how to scan a negative as if it were paper. I figured I’d play a bit and put the white background back in the bottom of the lid and removed the negative from the scan tray, placing it emulsion side down so the film curled away from the glass, then ran the software as normal for scanning documents.

Well, that worked. Kind of…

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Intrigued, but not totally satisfied that I couldn’t get the scanner to work properly, I set about fiddling some more. I noticed a button near the bottom of the interface that was labeled “reset” and thought, what the hell, then clicked it.

And this time the machine worked as designed. Happiness.

After a few dialog boxes, everything seemed like normal, so I set the scanner up again for negatives.

And this time the machine worked as designed. Happiness.

Here’s the result…

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I like them both. You can see more detail in the shadows of the first scan, and I like the somewhat distressed appearance. The second, proper scan is very clear (for a pinhole shot) and not as washed out.

It’s a 3 second exposure, taken at the La Frontera shopping mall, from a car wash located in the southeast corner of the property. I asked permission to park and played in an adjacent field, with my tripod and camera set-up in the shadows cast by the fly-over.

Love the lines, curves, and shadows. The sun was still pretty low in the sky and being blocked by the column on the left side of the image.

* a fat roll is when 120 film does not roll tightly around the take-up spool, usually resulting in light leaking to expose the edges of the last few coils at the end of the roll.

Rusty shutters #12.

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Leica D-Lux 4.

June 2009.

I saw a picture of this camera in Kelly Castro’s Flickr stream, with the 24mm viewfinder. I had to have it. So cool.

And even though it’s a Leica branded clone of Panasonic’s Lumix LX-3, it’s still the only Leica I’m likely to own.

I had to add the Franiec grip. As much as I like the simplicity of design, without the grip it was hard to hold. And I also purchased that viewfinder at the same time.

It’s a great little camera with awesome macro capability. Leica glass, too. Duh.

It was my first digital camera that had a switch on the lens barrel for image size settings, and though it couldn’t shoot 1:1 when I purchased it, a firmware upgrade made that possible through the menu system.

I still use this little guy.

Resolution: 10.1 megapixels
Max image size – 3648 x 2736
Display: 3in fixed LCD @ 460,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2
Focal Length: 24-60mm
Macro: .4in
Metering: Multi, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions: 4.3in x 2.3in x 1.1in
Weight: 8 oz.
Power: Lithium Ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC

Rusty shutters #11.

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Nikon Coolpix P300.

March 2011.

One of my all-time favorite cameras is the original Nikon One•Touch 35mm ƒ/2.8, compact autofocus. We got ours brand new back in the 80s and it lasted well into the 90s before it died. It was a simple, easy to use camera that made great pictures. I was heartbroken when it stopped working.

The Nikon Coolpix P300 has that same simple feel. I was drawn to it because it’s such a basic little pocket camera. Super easy to use, feels good in the hand, and has a small, but useful, built-in finger grip on the front and a thumb grip on the back. The LCD display fills the back of the camera and controls are minimal.

I shoot in aperture-priority mode, and ƒ-stops are easy to change using the rotary multi-selector on the back of the camera.

This little point and shoot produces really great images.

Resolution: 12 megapixels
Max image size – 4000 x 3000
Display: 3in LCD @ 921,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 2000, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 8 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/1.8-4.9
Focal Length: 24-100mm
Macro: 1.2in
Metering: center-weighted, multi-segment
Dimensions: 4.1in x 2.3in x 1.3in
Weight: 6.7 oz
Power: Rechargeable Li-ion Battery (EN-EL12)
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Rusty shutters #10.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1.

December 2009.

This camera was a game changer for me.

My first mirrorless, it’s a super-nifty little Micro Four Thirds camera and along with the 20mm ƒ/1.7 lens, I made bunches of nice images with this little gem.

I first heard of this camera through Craig Mod’s blog post titled “GF1 Fieldtest – 16 Days in the Himalayas.” His detailed review, high praise, and the gorgeous photos he shared were all hard to ignore.

The first time I held one and fiddled with it was early December 2009 while attending a photo meet-up in Santa Clara, at the coffee shop across El Camino Real from Santa Clara University’s Loyola Hall.

One of the folks attending brought along his recently acquired GF1/20mm ƒ/1.7 and was kind enough to let me hold it and play with it a bit.

The minute I pressed the shutter release I was hooked – it made a convincing click-thunk sound – you knew you’d just made a picture.

The GF1 is so cool. Small, 12 megapixels, used interchangeable Panasonic and Olympus lenses, quick auto-focus, a 3″ display, and an external viewfinder could be added.

I’ve even attached a Lensbaby Composer Pro/Sweet 35, the Pentax 25mm ƒ/1.4 CCTV, and the Wanderlust Pinwide. Pictured is the Panasonic 14mm ƒ/2.5, a nice street lens.

By Christmas I had one of my own, along with the 20mm ƒ1.7 and the EVF.

Some of my fave portraits were made with this little guy and I’ve shot a lot of cool cars and beautiful flowers with it, too.

Resolution: 12.1 megapixels
Max image size – 4000 x 3000
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.69in x 2.8in x 1.43in
Weight: 13.58 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/MMC