Rusty shutters #13.

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Fujifilm X100S.

July 2013.

As soon as it was released, I’d had my eye on the X100 but wasn’t ready to make the purchase.

And then when I was ready, Fukishima happened. So I waited some more, which turned out to be a good thing, because I was able to get my hands on the X100S, its successor.

The X100S is a classic camera in its look, it’s feel, and its operation. Everything you need to operate in full manual mode is available on the outside of the camera. I love that.

The Fujifilm menu system is one of my faves. It’s intuitive and just plain simple to use.

All the buttons and dials on the camera are easy to access and add greatly to the functionality of this camera. Smooth.

The only issue I had was holding the camera comfortably, but a silver LensMate thumb rest took care of that problem.

Plus I added a black Gariz half-case and the silver JJC lens shade.

Fun camera.

Resolution: 16 megapixels
Max image size: 4896 x 3264
Display: 2.8in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
Viewfinder: Electronic and optical, 2,350,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 00 sec – 1/4000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 35mm
Macro: 3.94in
Metering: Multi-segment, average, spot
Dimensions: 5in x 2.91in x 2.13in
Power: Lithium-Ion NP-95 rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

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Rusty shutters #11.

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Nikon Coolpix P300.

March 2011.

One of my all-time favorite cameras is the original Nikon One•Touch 35mm ƒ/2.8, compact autofocus. We got ours brand new back in the 80s and it lasted well into the 90s before it died. It was a simple, easy to use camera that made great pictures. I was heartbroken when it stopped working.

The Nikon Coolpix P300 has that same simple feel. I was drawn to it because it’s such a basic little pocket camera. Super easy to use, feels good in the hand, and has a small, but useful, built-in finger grip on the front and a thumb grip on the back. The LCD display fills the back of the camera and controls are minimal.

I shoot in aperture-priority mode, and ƒ-stops are easy to change using the rotary multi-selector on the back of the camera.

This little point and shoot produces really great images.

Resolution: 12 megapixels
Max image size – 4000 x 3000
Display: 3in LCD @ 921,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 160, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 2000, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 8 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/1.8-4.9
Focal Length: 24-100mm
Macro: 1.2in
Metering: center-weighted, multi-segment
Dimensions: 4.1in x 2.3in x 1.3in
Weight: 6.7 oz
Power: Rechargeable Li-ion Battery (EN-EL12)
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

Rusty shutters #10.

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GF1.

December 2009.

This camera was a game changer for me.

My first mirrorless, it’s a super-nifty little Micro Four Thirds camera and along with the 20mm ƒ/1.7 lens, I made bunches of nice images with this little gem.

I first heard of this camera through Craig Mod’s blog post titled “GF1 Fieldtest – 16 Days in the Himalayas.” His detailed review, high praise, and the gorgeous photos he shared were all hard to ignore.

The first time I held one and fiddled with it was early December 2009 while attending a photo meet-up in Santa Clara, at the coffee shop across El Camino Real from Santa Clara University’s Loyola Hall.

One of the folks attending brought along his recently acquired GF1/20mm ƒ/1.7 and was kind enough to let me hold it and play with it a bit.

The minute I pressed the shutter release I was hooked – it made a convincing click-thunk sound – you knew you’d just made a picture.

The GF1 is so cool. Small, 12 megapixels, used interchangeable Panasonic and Olympus lenses, quick auto-focus, a 3″ display, and an external viewfinder could be added.

I’ve even attached a Lensbaby Composer Pro/Sweet 35, the Pentax 25mm ƒ/1.4 CCTV, and the Wanderlust Pinwide. Pictured is the Panasonic 14mm ƒ/2.5, a nice street lens.

By Christmas I had one of my own, along with the 20mm ƒ1.7 and the EVF.

Some of my fave portraits were made with this little guy and I’ve shot a lot of cool cars and beautiful flowers with it, too.

Resolution: 12.1 megapixels
Max image size – 4000 x 3000
Display: Fixed 3in LCD @ 460,000 pixels
ISO: Auto, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.69in x 2.8in x 1.43in
Weight: 13.58 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/MMC

Rusty shutters #8.

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Olympus E-PL3.

October 2011.

This camera holds a lot of awesome memories.

The E-PL3 was a gift. Or rather a reward, I suppose.

When I worked at Santa Clara University I was chosen as what amounts to the 2011 “Employee of the Year” for our division. I didn’t see it coming and being chosen totally blew me away. Something I’ll always remember and cherish.

There was also a cash bonus that came along with the award. Nice.

Torri and me planned a trip to Italy, happening later that same year, and I wanted to bring along a new digital camera.

The bonus from the award paid for the E-PL3. It got plenty of use on the trip.

I chose the E-PL3 over the Olympus PEN E-P3 because of the sleek, more modern appearance – they’re essentially the same camera.

I added the Franiac grip and the versatile VF-2 viewfinder, but one of my favorite features is the flip-up rear display. So handy.

The Olympus 17mm ƒ/2.8 gets the most use, but I have a healthy collection of M43 lenses and have used the Lensbaby Composer Pro/Sweet 35 combo and the 25mm ƒ/1.4 Pentax CCTV lens on this camera.

The Olympus menu system isn’t my fave, but I manage to get around without too much trouble.

This is definitely one of my fave shooters that still gets a lot of use.

Resolution: 12.3 megapixels
Max image size – 4032 x 3024
Display: 3in LCD @ 153,000 pixels
ISO: 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, 12800
Shutter Speeds: 60 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions WHD: 4.3in x 2.5in x 1.5in
Weight: 9.35 oz
Power: Lithium-ion rechargeable battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC/SDXC

 

Rusty shutters #5.

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Ricoh GR Digital II

July 2008.

Fun little camera.

Tiny. Killer. Awesome macro.

Love the 1:1 format, the GRD2 was my first digital with that option and boy did I abuse it. This is a couple of years before Instagram launched.

Love the B&W.

Love the 28mm.

Acquired new mid-2008, I’ve even got the little GV-2 add-on viewfinder, the wide-angle adapter and lens, the external cable/switch, and the AC adapter.

Resolution: 10 megapixels
Max image size – 3648 x 2736
Display: 2.7in LCD @ 230,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 180 sec – 1/2000 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.4
Focal Length: 28mm
Macro: .6in
Metering: Multi-segment, spot
Dimensions: 4.2in x 2.3in x 1.0in
Power: Li-Ion battery
Memory card: SD/SDHC

Rusty shutters #3.

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Canon Powershot S3IS.

The Canon Powershot S3IS is a smallish digital point and shoot camera that I added to my collection in late 2006, nearly 13 years ago.

The digital camera is equipped with a substantial, yet comfortable grip, a swing-out/swivel display, and awesome zoom capability. The S3IS has amazing macro, too.

I used the S3IS for a couple of years, in between a bunch of old film cameras that I’ll highlight in weeks to come.

My sister is using this camera now.

Resolution: 6 megapixels
Max image size – 2816 x 2112
Display: 2in LCD @ 115,000 pixels
Zoom: 4x digital
ISO: Auto, 80, 100, 200, 400, 800
Shutter Speeds: 15 sec – 1/3200 sec
Aperture: ƒ/2.7–3.5
Focal Length: 36–432mm
Macro: .39in
Metering: Evaluative, center-weighted average, spot
Dimensions: 4.45in x 3.07in x 2.99in
Weight: 14.5 oz
Power: 4 AA batteries
Memory card: SD/SDHC

 

Rusty shutters #2.

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Pentax *ist D.

The Pentax *ist D was my first digital SLR. We’re talking 2006, some 13 years ago.

I’d looked at all available options at the time and concluded that the bodies of the Nikon and Canon offerings were just way too big.

The *ist D weighs less, is easier to hold, and compact in comparison. That was enough to sell me on going down the Pentax path.

I still use this camera today, mostly for TtV. It’s been well taken care of. Seriously. Except for the smallish rubber cover for the cable release socket falling off, this camera looks brand new.

The *ist D is powered by four rechargeable AA nickel metal hydride batteries, and I’m using an original speedy Lexar 80x 2GB Compact Flash card.

The menu system and camera controls are easy to use and the viewfinder works just fine. The small LCD display is only functional for the menu system and playback, not for framing up a shot. It was 2006, remember?

I have a decent collection of lenses for this camera, both Pentax and Sigma, but Sigma’s 28-135mm 3.5-5.6 macro gets the most use. The SMC Pentax FA 50mm f/1.4 is a close second.

I also have a few different K-mount Lensbaby lenses, the most recent being their Composer Pro with mainly the Sweet 35 optic.

Red earring, Princess Ally, Yellow, Pink tutus, Spring Clean.

Resolution: 6.1 megapixels
Max image size – 3008 x 12008
Display: 1.8in LCD @ 118,000 pixels
ISO: 200, 400, 800, 1600
Shutter Speeds: 30 sec – 1/4000 sec
Metering: Multi-segment, center-weighted, spot
Dimensions: 5in x 3.7in x 2.3in
Weight: 18 oz
Power: 4 AA batteries
Memory card: CompactFlash